• Church Yearley
    1971

    Church Yearley

    Johns Hopkins University

    Church Yearley

    Johns Hopkins University

    Church Yearley was born on January 2, 1913 in Baltimore, where he started his lacrosse career at the age of thirteen. This early interest was generated by the award of a lacrosse stick as a Sunday School prize by his teacher, Douglas C. Turnbull, Jr., a long-time member of the Hall of Fame. Church played two years with the Hopkins Midgets, an organized team of pre-high school boys, before entering City College. At City he earned letters in 1928, 1929 and 1930 and was elected captain of the team in 1930. That same year, he was named to the All-America Scholastic Team. Matriculating at Johns Hopkins University the following fall, Church earned a minor letter his freshman year and was a regular in the seasons of 1932, 1933 and 1934. In 1932, he played on the U.S. Olympic Team. He was named to the All-America teams in 1933 and 1934 and was selected to play on the All-Star Team in both of those years. After graduation, he moved to New York and continued his lacrosse with the Crescent Club of Brooklyn. In 1936 he switched his allegiance to the Mt. Washington Club and commuted to Baltimore each weekend for the games. Church was elected to the executive board of the U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association in 1936 and served until a move to Atlanta, Georgia ended his active participation in lacrosse. Following four years in the Navy during World War II, he returned to Baltimore with the Equitable Trust Co., staying with them until 1953 when he left Baltimore to become associated with the First National Bank of Atlanta. He became successfully assistant vice president, vice president, executive vice president and vice chairman of the board. He was also a trustee of Johns Hopkins University. Church passed away in June, 2008 in Atlanta. He was the last surviving member of the 1932 U.S. Olympic team.

  • Arthur F. Spring
    1971

    Arthur F. Spring

    United States Naval Academy

    Arthur F. Spring

    United States Naval Academy

    When Arthur F. Spring was sixteen, he represented Laconia, New Hampshire, in the State Oratorical High School Championship and was awarded first prize, which consisted of a gold medal and his choice of an appointment to the Naval Academy or the Military Academy. Having never previously heard of either institution, he selected the Naval Academy based on an encyclopedia's description of its summer cruises to Europe. In preparation for Annapolis, he enrolled at the Severn School in 1926, where he lettered in football, basketball and baseball, but did not play lacrosse. Spring entered the Naval Academy with the class of 1930. In his Plebe year, he lettered in football, basketball and baseball. In his sophomore year, he acquired national prominence as Navy's starting half-back when he scored the first Navy touchdown ever scored against Notre Dame. This game marked the inception of the Navy-Notre Dame football series which today, for both schools, is their longest continuous football rivalry. He received honorable mention All-America honors in football in 1927. In the spring of 1928, Spring began to play lacrosse. In his first year of playing the game, he was selected as a first team All-American for the first defense position and led Navy to the national championship. He earned first team All-America honors again in 1929 and 1930. A career officer, Spring's early career consisted of tours in destroyers, cruisers, and post graduate school. He was executive officer, USS Missouri (BB-63), at the end of World War II, and later commanded USS Mount Katmai (AE-16), USS Renvill (APA-227) and the USS Helena (CA-75). In 1958, as chief of staff of the Seventh Fleet, he was selected for Rear Admiral. His first flag tour was as Commander Naval Base, Subic Bay, Philippines, which he assumed in the spring of 1959. Spring and his wife, the former Clare Murphy, were killed in an airplane accident in the Phillipines on November 14, 1960.

  • Howard Myers
    1971

    Howard Myers

    University of Virginia

    Howard Myers

    University of Virginia

    Myers, an outstanding football and basketball player at Boys Latin in Baltimore from 1925-28 and the University of Virginia from 1928-32, is revered for his legendary coaching ability. In his coaching career of 46 years (1933-1979), Howdy compiled a lacrosse record of 379-141-6. Howdy's coaching career began in 1932 at Donaldson School as the athletics director and football, basketball and lacrosse coach. From a student body of 33, he chose a lacrosse team that went 13-1-1. In 1933, he moved to Friends School to coach lacrosse, football and basketball, compiling a lacrosse record of 23-5-1. From 1936-1946, Howdy was the athletics director, math teacher and head football, basketball and lacrosse coach at St. Paul's. Responsible for establishing St. Paul's as a national lacrosse power, his teams compiled a record of 135-18-2. His last four teams went undefeated, winning 61 straight games and seven consecutive MSA Championships. In 1946, he became the head lacrosse, football and basketball coach at Johns Hopkins. Undefeated intercollegiately in lacrosse for three seasons, his teams won national championships in 1947, 1948 and 1949. In 1950, he became the athletics director, head football and lacrosse coach at Hofstra. Establishing Hofstra's lacrosse program, he coached for 25 years, winning seven divisional championships and compiling a 180-115-3 record. In 1976, he became Hampden-Sydney's first full-time head lacrosse coach. He coached three years, compiling a 22-18 record. Hampden-Sydney gives the Howdy Myers Award annually to the lacrosse team's MVP. Howdy was honored with the Coach of the Year Award in 1970 and the Governor's Trophy for contiunuous and meaningful contribution to lacrosse in 1971. He returned to Hopkins in 1978 as the JV lacrosse and head football coach, coaching until his death. Howdy Myers passed away in 1980.

  • Ivan M. Marty
    1970

    Ivan M. Marty

    University of Maryland

    Ivan M. Marty

    University of Maryland

    Ivan attended Baltimore City College for three years and attained two varsity letters. His high school career was interrupted by military service in the tank corps, during World War II, but he still managed to be captain of the 1919 lacrosse team and made first team All-Maryland in the same year. He was also captain of varsity football and president of his class, which for a school as big as City, was quite remarkable. Ivan then attended St John's in 1920 where he was captain as well as player/coach. He was instrumental in the founding and early success of this team. He moved on to the University of Maryland, where he won two first team All-America awards in 1923 and 1924 and was a member of the University of Maryland All-Star team. He also captained the team in 1923 and 1924. After his playing days were over, Ivan coached defense for five years at Maryland and played for one year on the L'Hirondelle club team. Ivan served on the vestry of St John's Episcopal Church in Western Run Valley as well as being the assistant director of the Bureau of Milk Control for many years.

  • Thomas Truxtun
    1970

    Thomas Truxtun

    United States Military Academy

    Thomas Truxtun

    United States Military Academy

    Truxtun attended the United States Naval Academy for one year and played on the Plebe lacrosse team. Placed on physical disability for two years, he entered the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY in 1933 once he was well. After playing Plebe lacrosse for Army, Truxtun played three years first string lacrosse and was selected First Team All-American in 1935, 1936 and 1937. Playing the center position, Truxtun was selected in his first class year as captain of the lacrosse team that ended a remarkable season by defeating Navy. In 1937, Laurie Cox, Chairman of the Selection Committee, called Truxtun "the greatest player in the country." He also played first string varsity soccer for Army during that time. Stationed at Ft. Bragg after graduation, he played polo, tennis and rode in horse shows. Killed in action near Baguio, Luzon, Phillipines Islands on June 6, 1945, Truxtun received the Purple Heart, Silver Star and the Bronze Star Medal for his outstanding service and gallantry in action.

  • Fritz R. Stude
    1970

    Fritz R. Stude

    Johns Hopkins University

    Fritz R. Stude

    Johns Hopkins University

    Fritz Stude was born in 1910, in Baltimore. He lived for a while in Ontario, Canada, before moving back to Catonsville, Maryland. He entered Catonsville High School in 1926 and graduated in 1929. The school did not have lacrosse, but he won letters in soccer (3 years), basketball (2 years), tennis (2 years) and track (2 years). He was captain of the 1929 basketball state championship team and was center forward on the state championship soccer team. Entering Johns Hopkins University, he played freshman basketball and then played varsity basketball and lacrosse for two years. In 1932, he was the goalie on Johns Hopkins' national championship team, which after an eight-team play-off in the Baltimore Stadium, represented the United States at the tenth Olympic Games in Los Angeles. During the years 1930-1940, Fritz played in the goal for the Mt. Washington team, which won seven national championships. He was a member of the All-American Team which toured England in 1937, and he received a Knights of Columbus gold lacrosse stick as a "Lacrosse Standout." He is a member of the All-Time Great Teams for Johns Hopkins and Mt. Washington. Fritz was active as a lacrosse official from 1945-1961, served a term as president of the Southern Lacrosse Officials and is a lifetime member of that organization. He helped start lacrosse at Mt. St. Mary's College in Emmitsburg, Maryland. For sixteen years, he coached the youngsters of the Mt. Washington Warriors and saw five of his former players become college All-Americans in one year. He is an honorary life member of the United States Lacrosse Coaches Association. He has been ranked in Baltimore as a tennis player and has been an active golfer. After being in the advertising department of the Baltimore Sun and of the Washington Evening Star, he was employed by Proctor and Gamble in sales and distribution. He served in the Air Force during World War II. Fritz Stude passed away in December, 1991.

  • Caleb R. Kelly
    1969

    Caleb R. Kelly

    Johns Hopkins University

    Caleb R. Kelly

    Johns Hopkins University

    Caleb Redgrave Kelly, Jr. was born in Baltimore in 1911, the eldest of two boys, both of whom loved sports. His brother, Donaldson, is also a member of the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame. Caleb began playing lacrosse in his junior year at Friends' school and in that year he was the creaseman on the only unbeaten high school team in Maryland. In his senior year, he won varsity letters in football, basketball and lacrosse and again was part of a championship lacrosse team. Entering Johns Hopkins University in 1929, Caleb participated in freshman football and became a member of the lacrosse team. He did not play regularly in lacrosse until his junior year, and then as a midfielder he played on the undefeated Hopkins team which represented the United States in the 1932 Olympic Games. This team won two out of three games played against Canada in Los Angeles, the first game played before 80,000 people. In 1932, Caleb was also captain of the Hopkins basketball team and president of his class. In his senior year, he played basketball and was again a midfielder on a championship Hopkins lacrosse team, and by the time of his graduation in 1933 he had won six varsity letters. After attending Maryland Law School, he became a member of the Maryland Bar and practiced in Baltimore. Caleb helped organize the Baltimore Athletic Club lacrosse team in 1935. He played midfield and attack and also helped coach this team, which was important in the lacrosse scene in the late thirties, and which won the open championship in 1936. In 1942, he entered the Army Air Corps as a private, graduated from OCS in Miami, and remained in the Air Force Reserve. In 1968, he was placed on the retired reserve list as lieutenant colonel. Following the war, Caleb joined the local officials' association and officiated in the Baltimore area for 16 years. He was chairman of the Officials' Association for seven years, and in 1959, he completely recodified the lacrosse rules under the sponsorship of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. In 1948, he became coach of the newly formed University of Baltimore lacrosse team and during his years as coach, his teams were noted for strong extra man play. In 1959, acting for the USILA and USLCA, Caleb helped organize the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation. He acted as counsel for the Foundation from that date and was its executive secretary until 1968. In addition, he was recording secretary and treasurer for this nine-year period and was director of the Foundation at the time of its origin. Caleb Kelly passed away in September, 2006.

  • Thomas S. Strobhar
    1969

    Thomas S. Strobhar

    Johns Hopkins University

    Thomas S. Strobhar

    Johns Hopkins University

    Strobhar graduated from Williston Academy in 1901 and attended Johns Hopkins University, graduating with an B.A. degree in 1904. After his graduation, he was continually connected with the insurance business and was of his own insurance agency in Philadelphia by the name of Wagner Taylor Company. Tom played on the Johns Hopkins lacrosse teams of 1902, 1903, 1904 and 1905. The latter were Intercollegiate Champions. He was a member of the championship Mt. Washington Club in 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912 and 1913. He played at the Philadelphia Lacrosse Club in 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912 and 1913. He played for the Philadelphia comets during the seasons of 1929, 1930 and 1931 and the Seagulls in 1932 and 1933. These were both box lacrosse teams and Tom was one of the best goalies in the game. Tom's coaching career included assisting at Navy in 1905 and 1906, Lehigh in 1907 and 1908, University of Pennsylvania, 1909-11, the Penn Athletic Club, 1925-28, and Swarthmore College, 1927-30. Tom's officiating career included consecutive years of refereeing mainly in the Philadelphia district from 1922 through 1936. During World War I, Tom was a lieutenant in the United States Coast Guard and served with great honor, just as he did in all of his endeavors.

  • Charles F. Ellinger
    1969

    Charles F. Ellinger

    University of Maryland

    Charles F. Ellinger

    University of Maryland

    Ellinger was born in 1914 in Baltimore and graduated from Baltimore City College High School in 1933 and from the University of Maryland in 1937. He has a Masters Degree in Business Administration from Harvard. Charlie played lacrosse informally for the Hopkins Bulldogs and then for City and was a member of City's Maryland Scholastic Association Championship Team in 1933. At the University of Maryland, he played on the National Collegiate Championship teams of 1935, 1936 and 1937 and was selected a first team All-American attack in all three years. He was named a member of the United States teams that played in Vancouver, Canada in 1935 and 1936. For three years he played for the Baltimore Athletic Club. Charlie also played football and basketball and was elected to the State of Maryland Athletic Hall of Fame in 1969. For twenty years, he was a member of the Maryland Lacrosse Officials and Southern Lacrosse Officials Associations and was district chief referee for each. He was the official's representative on the executive board of the United States Lacrosse Coaches Association. He has also been a member of the Quarterback Club; President of Colt Associates; President of Alumni Club of the University of Maryland and on its Board of Governors; a member of the "M" Club of the University of Maryland; and president of the Maryland Board of Football Officials. He has been Secretary of the Terrapin Club and on the Board of Governors of the Mt. Washington Club. Serving in the Navy in World War II, his PT Squadron in the Pacific received Presidential Citation, five Battle Stars and five Area Ribbons. Charley Ellinger passed away in 1970.

  • William F. Logan
    1969

    William F. Logan

    Johns Hopkins University

    William F. Logan

    Johns Hopkins University

    William Francis Logan was born in 1905, in Texas, Maryland, the second of three boys. Shortly afterwards his family moved to nearby Cockeysville. Bill graduated from Towson High School in 1923, and while there, he excelled in basketball and soccer. The following year he entered Mount Saint Mary's (Md.)College before transferring to Johns Hopkins University at the beginning of his junior year. At that time the University had neither basketball nor baseball at its campus. The absence of these sports, plus a strong love of athletics spurred Bill to buy his first lacrosse stick and try out for the Hopkins team. As a member of the sub squad, Bill caught the eye of Norman Robinson, star player and later captain of the 1927 squad. Encouraged by Robinson, Bill learned the fundamentals of stick handling and at the beginning of the 1927 season, a week before the opening game, was placed on the first team as a replacement for an injured player. Teaming with Robinson in his first intercollegiate game, Bill registered nine goals against the University of Virginia and went on to become one of the top scorers in the country. He was selected as an All-American in 1927. Logan graduated from Hopkins in 1927 and, under the existing rules, returned as a graduate student to play another season. That year, Hopkins won the national playoffs and the right to represent the United States at the 1928 Olympics, played in Amsterdam. That same year "Father Bill" Schmeisser selected him to the All-Time Johns Hopkins team. 

    Logan's coaching career was launched in 1929 when he coached the high school varsity at Baltimore City College. In the fall of 1930, he was invited to come to Princeton as frosh coach in soccer and lacrosse. In 1936, he was appointed head coach of soccer and lacrosse and director of intramural athletics at Princeton. In 1940, he was appointed supervisor of physical education. In connection with this appointment he was relieved of his coaching responsibilities in soccer but continued as head coach of lacrosse through the spring of 1944. During the 1942-43 and 1943-44 seasons, he served as head coach of basketball also. Under Bill's tutelage Princeton's lacrosse teams ranked every year among the top four teams in the country. In 1937, they were ranked number one jointly with the University of Maryland and in 1942 they were declared Intercollegiate Champions. Each year while Bill coached lacrosse at Princeton at least one or two members of the squad were named to the All-American team. He was a member of the three-coach committee that directed the North team in the nation's first North-South lacrosse classic in 1940 and was head coach of the North team the following year. In 1945, Bill returned to Johns Hopkins as director of admissions. On the side, he assisted in the coaching of freshmen and varsity lacrosse. He was instrumental in founding the United States Lacrosse Coaches Association and served as secretary and later as president. He was a member of the USILA committee that experimented with the ten-man game prior to its adoption. In 1959, Bill resigned from Hopkins to become community manager of Sherwood Forest, a unique family-club community near Annapolis. In 1966, he returned to the University as the academic advisor and counselor of freshmen and also assisted with frosh lacrosse. Bill Logan passed away in 1989.

  •  Gordon A. Armstrong
    1969

    Gordon A. Armstrong

    Johns Hopkins University

    Gordon A. Armstrong

    Johns Hopkins University

    A. Gordon Armstrong was born in Baltimore, Maryland on March 17, 1886. He first played lacrosse at Baltimore City College in 1903. Attending Johns Hopkins University, he played lacrosse for only one season, yet was selected for the Johns Hopkins All-Time Team. He was a member of the Hopkins Intercollegiate Championship Team of 1908 and was selected for the Olympics but could not make the trip. He was secretary of the Johns Hopkins Athletic Association for three years. After graduation in 1908, Gordon Armstrong played for the Johns Hopkins University Graduate Team for one year and then for the Mt. Washington Team from 1909 to 1916. During these years he was a familiar figure in the Mt. Washington attack and was one of the leaders responsible for the great success of his team. He was captain of the team in 1915. He was noted for his effective face dodge and is on the Mt. Washington Club Honor Roll as one of its great players. Armstrong helped start lacrosse at the U.S. Naval Academy and recommended their first professional coach. He worked with and encouraged the Mt. Washington Junior Team from 1910-1913. He was active for many years as a lacrosse official. First with the Fidelity and Deposit Company of Maryland, he then went to Boston in 1920 and became manager of the Bond Department of the Employers' Liability Assurance Company until he retired in 1952. He was secretary of the Assurance Society of Massachusetts for three years. Gordon Armstrong and his wife, Clarisse, lived in Wellesley, Massachusetts until his death in 1967.

  •  F. G. LaMotte
    1969

    F. G. LaMotte

    Mt. Washington Lacrosse Club

    F. G. LaMotte

    Mt. Washington Lacrosse Club

    F. Gibbs LaMotte was born in Carroll County (Md.) in 1889. His family moved to Baltimore when he was very young. They remained in the city until 1901, when they moved to Mt. Washington. The Mt. Washington Club at that time consisted of several tennis courts, and the grounds of the old Baltimore Cricket Club. About 1905, the families of the community formed a group that made a settlement for the property and created the Mt. Washington Club. Baseball and football teams were organized, and a few years later, lacrosse was added. Gibbs entered Baltimore Polytechnic in 1905. Football was his only interest among the various sports activities. He played on the varsity football team as a hard running half back in his freshman year and the three succeeding years. In his senior year, he was captain of the team and vice president of his class.He graduated in 1909 and selected Cornell for a civil engineering course, but conditions at that time prevented his going to college. Instead, he entered business with his father. After twenty-one years with his father, and a short period in banking, he entered the life insurance business in 1930. Gibbs started his lacrosse career at Mt. Washington, where he became a keen student of the game under Coach Bill Schmeisser.Gibbs advanced so rapidly that he played on the team in his first year. He specialized in defense and played full time (at point) in every game during the sixteen years between 1909-1925, and became known as the ""Iron Man"". Except for about six years, he also coached. In 1925, his handling of his players was an important factor in a great victory over The Crescent Club (the second time in 20 years that the Hillmen had triumphed over this rival), and Mt. Washington was the championship lacrosse club of the nation. In those days the Mounts won ninety-eight percent of their games. He is very proud of the honor awarded him by the Club in the form of a certificate which reads "This is to certify that Gibbs LaMotte - Defense - has been selected as one of the all-time great lacrosse players." Gibbs LaMotte passed away in 1970.