• John F. Kelly
    1969

    John F. Kelly

    University of Maryland

    John F. Kelly

    University of Maryland

    Kelly was a first team All-American goalie of the U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association in 1936 and 1937, his junior and senior years at the University of Maryland. The Terps lost only one collegiate game during the three years that Kelly was guarding the Maryland goal. Maryland was undefeated in collegiate competition in 1936-1937, in 1936 winning the W. Wilson Wingate Trophy, symbolic of lacrosse supremacy and sharing the trophy with Princeton in 1937. Kelly's first introduction to lacrosse was at Boys' Latin School in Baltimore, where he was a member of the 1932 Maryland Scholastic Association champions. Kelly was an All-Maryland Prep selection as goalie.Loyola College, after an absence from lacrosse circles for approximately ten years, resumed collegiate lacrosse in 1938 and Kelly was named head lacrosse coach. He coached at Loyola until the end of 1941, when he resigned because of World War II. His Greyhounds, who never had a losing season, won sixty-five percent of all their games.Kelly was named editor of the Lacrosse Coaches Association Newsletter in 1951. He changed the name of the publication to the Lacrosse Newsletter in 1954 and continued to edit and publish the newsletter through 1974. In addition to editing the Lacrosse Newsletter, Kelly also promoted lacrosse by encouraging editors of other sports publications to give greater coverage to lacrosse.His contacts among the college coaches enabled a number of high school lacrosse players to receive financial help in college. His promotion work was also responsible for at least two colleges recognizing lacrosse as a varsity sport. His advice and assistance to students at the University of Notre Dame in helping to establish lacrosse on a club basis led to the setting up of the Notre Dame John F. Kelly Trophy, which is awarded to the winner of the Notre Dame Invitational Lacrosse Tournament. Several sports writers considered the Newsletter their lacrosse bible. Jack Kelly served as Chairman of the USILA Publicity Committee from 1954 to 1966. He had been a member of the Board of Directors of the Lacrosse Foundation, Inc., after it was established. In 1958 he received the USILA award for his contribution to lacrosse during the year. Jack Kelly passed away in 1998.

  • Frederick A. Wyatt
    1969

    Frederick A. Wyatt

    Union College

    Frederick A. Wyatt

    Union College

    Wyatt attended Hempstead (N.Y.) High School, where lacrosse was not then played. He graduated from Union (N.Y.) College in 1932. Fred played on the Union lacrosse team for four years and in his senior year was selected as an All-American at third attack. In this same year, he was selected as a member of a team to play exhibition games en route to the Olympic Games. Following graduation, he was associated with Union College until 1954, and during this time he was freshman lacrosse coach. In 1932 he was instrumental in organizing the Mohawk Lacrosse Club in Schenectady, and for ten years played for this team and was also its coach, captain and playing manager. For many years he was a member of the New England and Middle Atlantic Officials Association. He served for ten years with Charles Marsters on a New England Secondary School and College Lacrosse Expansion Committee.In addition to coaching, Wyatt served in the Placement Office and in the Alumni Relations Office at Union and became director of admissions. In 1969 he received the Union College Alumni award for notable service. In 1954 he left Union to become a professor and assistant to the president at William Jewell College in Missouri. He was a member of the College Entrance Examination Board, President of the Eastern College Personnel Officers' Associaton and Secretary of the New York State Association of Deans and Guidance Officers. He was a Trustee of Tahoe College and of the Los Angeles Community College. Beginning in 1956, he was a management consultant. After moving to California, he continued his interest in lacrosse. He was a member of the Southern California Lacrosse Association beginning in 1963 and was its president in 1963. He was active in promoting the game in California and conducted lacrosse demonstrations between the halves of Rams games at the Los Angeles Coliseum. In 1965 he was made an Honorary Life Member of the United States Lacrosse Coaches Association. Fred Wyatt passed away in 2001.

  • Philip L. Lotz
    1968

    Philip L. Lotz

    St. John's College

    Philip L. Lotz

    St. John's College

    Philip Lee Lotz, considered one of the great defensemen of all time, played along side his equally famous brother, Ed, to form the backbone of a defense which allowed a total of seven goals over a ten-game schedule. He played on a St. John's College team that was Intercollegiate Champion in 1931 and which defeated Canada in the Lally Cup Series in that same year. He was chosen as All-American in 1931 and in 1932 and after the 1932 season was selected by sportswriter Wilson Wingate to be captain of the All-Time American Lacrosse Team. After graduation from St. John's in 1932, Phil played for Baltimore in the Box Lacrosse League and in the summer of 1933 he played for Cornwall in the Canadian League. In 1934, he was a member of the Baltimore Athletic Club Lacrosse Team, which won the open championship. He officiated in Virginia for several years and was helpful in starting lacrosse at Washington & Lee University. Born in Ellicott City, Maryland, Phil attended Ellicott City High School where he earned letters in soccer, basketball and baseball. At St. John's, he earned letters as an end in football (3 years), as guard in basketball (2 years) and as a defenseman in lacrosse (3 years). After receiving his BA degree from St. John's, he attended the University of Maryland Law School and during these years played football with the Irvington Team and basketball for the Baltimore Athletic Club. In 1999, Sports Illustrated listed Phil and his brother, Ed, as two of Maryland's 50 greatest athletes of the 20th Century.Phil Lotz received his LLD degree in 1935 from the University of Maryland and was an attorney in Staunton, Virginia. During World War II, he served as a special agent in the counter Intelligence Corps of the U.S. Army. Phil Lotz passed away in 1986.

  • James D. Iglehart
    1968

    James D. Iglehart

    Baltimore Athletic Club

    James D. Iglehart

    Baltimore Athletic Club

    Dr. Iglehart stands out as one of the pioneers of lacrosse in Baltimore, a captain and goalie of the earliest teams for the Baltimore Athletic Club. He helped to organize the Baltimore Athletic Club team and played in its first game on November 23, 1878. This was the first time lacrosse was played in Baltimore. For the three following years, the Baltimore Athletic Club team, including Dr. Iglehart, gave an excellent performance, playing club teams from New York, Boston, Brooklyn, and Philadelphia; also the Ravenwood Club, the Shamrocks of Montreal, the Tyro Club of Staten Island and the West End Ivanhoe Club. He was also a referee in some of the contests away from Baltimore. He was the first vice president of the United States National Lacrosse Association in its second year, 1880, and became its president in 1881, succeeding Herman Oelrichs of New York, who had been the association's first president. Dr. Iglehart recieved his B.A. degree from St. John's College in 1872. While there, he was a captain of cadets, captain of the baseball team and stroke on the crew team. In later years he was a member of the crew of the Undine Boat Club, a member of the Baltimore Cricket Club, president of the Baltimore Athletic Club and a member of the Century Cycling Club of Maryland. In 1875, he received his medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania and the M.A. degree from St. John's in 1878. From 1876 to 1934, he had a distinguished medical career in Baltimore as one of its best physicians; also a surgeon for the Fifth Regiment and B & O Railroad surgeon for fifty years. If it were not for the leadership of the BAC group, including Dr. Iglehart, lacrosse may never have come to Baltimore. The Baltimore Athletic Club team was the first one ever, and they continued to play three years after its 1878 start. Johns Hopkins University began lacrosse in 1883, and many programs followed. The interest generated in Baltimore by the early enthusiasts including Dr. Iglehart is the foundation that made Baltimore the center of the lacrosse world.

  • Morris D. Gilmore
    1968

    Morris D. Gilmore

    United States Naval Academy

    Morris D. Gilmore

    United States Naval Academy

    Captain Gilmore was a member of the first lacrosse team ever to represent the Naval Academy in 1908. As a menacing first defenseman, Gilmore lettered four seasons in lacrosse, although he had no prior experience with the game. He quickly earned a reputation for his sound tactics.After graduation from the Academy in 1911, Gilmore served with submarines in World War I. Forced by a physical disability to retire from active service after World War I, Gilmore continued his service to the Academy through athletics as secretary-treasurer of the Naval Academy Athletic Association from 1933-55. During that time, he also served as a member of the executive committee for the USILA for many years. He became second vice-president of the USILA in 1944, first vice-president in 1946 and president in 1948. For five years, Gilmore was also chairman of the lacrosse rules committee. During World War II, Gilmore requested active duty and went back into uniform, serving the Academy as assistant director of athletics and executive officer of the physical education department. Lacrosse was a major interest throughout Gilmore's life. His committment to the sport was instrumental to the advancement of lacrosse at the Naval Academy. Morris Gilmore passed away in 1960.

  • Winthrop A. Smith
    1968

    Winthrop A. Smith

    Yale University

    Winthrop A. Smith

    Yale University

    Winthrop "Pinky" Smith was a star center on the Yale lacrosse team for three years and was selected on the All-American Team in 1930 and 1931. In 1930, he played on the all-star team that represented the United States in the Canadian Lally Cup Series. He played on the Yale freshman team, which was Big Three Champion in 1928, and on the varsity teams, which were Big Three Champions in 1929 and 1931. He was captain on the Yale team. In 1932, Pinky was junior varsity lacrosse coach at Yale. He took over as freshman coach the next year, and then for two years was varsity coach. After World War II, he returned to Yale as varsity coach for the season of 1947. He accompanied the Yale team to England in 1950 and reamined active in lacrosse at Yale in an advisory capacity. He was active in encouraging Choate School and Milford Academy to form lacrosse teams and in 1961 helped in bringing the Oxford-Cambridge lacrosse team to the United States. Pinky was born in 1907 and graduated in 1926 from Milford High School, where he was captain of the football team for three years and where he was a member of the basketball, baseball and track teams for three years. Spending a year at Milford Academy, where he played football and baseball, he entered Yale in 1927 and received his BA degree in 1931. Always a resident of Milford, Connecticut, he was the town's first Eagle Scout and had three sons, all of whom were Eagle Scouts. He continued a deep interest in the Boy Scouts. Active in community affairs, Smith was Commander of the Milford American Legion Post, president of the Milford Rotary Club and chairman of the Milford Chapter of the American Red Cross. He was made manager of a junior league baseball team in 1947 and in 1952 was captain of the Milford Badminton Team, which won the Class "C" State Championship. He served in the Connecticut National Guard from 1928 to 1937. In World War II, Major Smith served in the European Theater of Operations 794th A.A. as intelligence officer, and was, after the war, Battalion Commander of the 439th, A.A.A. Married in 1935 to Louise Moulton, the Smiths had three sons, all who worked at George J. Smith & Son, where their father was senior vice president.

  • 1968

    Gaylord R. Auer

    Baltimore City College

    Gaylord R. Auer

    Baltimore City College

    Joining Bacharach Rasin Co. as a stock boy in 1919, Auer became sole owner of the company and from that time on he worked at the promotion of the game of lacrosse and in the improvement of its equipment. Interested in keeping down the cost of the game, in 1929 he arranged a partnership with a Canadian associate and for nearly forty years they produced most of the sticks in this country. Auer is an honorary Indian Chief, known as Chief Tioneka. In 1949 an equipment pool was organized, and it was administered by Auer and in 1955 he cooperated with the USILA and the USLCA in promoting a loan kit of equipment. Both of these projects did much to help start lacrosse in schools and colleges. Auer was an honorary life member of the USLCA, USILA, and "Man of the Year" in 1961. Auer resided in the Baltimore area for the majority of his life and passed away in 1981.

  •  Gordon S. Pugh
    1968

    Gordon S. Pugh

    University of Maryland

    Gordon S. Pugh

    University of Maryland

    Pugh was an athlete of amazing stamina, ability, and versatility. He was capable of playing every sport and excelled in all in which he participated, although lacrosse became his outstanding game. One of the greatest face-off men to play in the game of lacrosse, he earned first team All-American honors for three straight years. He was a high scorer and never permitted an opponent to score against him until his final college game. He continued playing the stick sport for the Mt. Washington Club for two years and was the first lacrosse coach at St. Paul's School.A product of Baltimore's Polytechnic High School, Willie was a great athlete there from 1924 to 1928. He was Poly's premiere performer, earning eleven major letters, and he was outstanding in football, track and lacrosse. He was captain of the 1927 lacrosse team, was high scorer for the track team, and was awarded Poly's gold football for his achievements on the gridiron and was also awarded the school's athletic medal. Born on July 11, 1909 in East Carondelete, Illinois, he started his college work at Butler University, where he won freshman numerals in football and track. Transferring to University of Maryland, he received his Bachelor's degree in 1933 and graduated from the Maryland Dental School in 1937. He did graduate work at Columbia University. During World War II, he served as a major with the Dental Corps of the United States Army. In 1946, he opened orthodontist offices in Salisbury and Easton, Maryland, and in 1954 to 1955 was president of the Eastern Shore Dental Society. He passed away in 1969.

  • Lorne R. Guild
    1967

    Lorne R. Guild

    Johns Hopkins University

    Lorne R. Guild

    Johns Hopkins University

    Guild was born in San Antonio, Texas in 1911. He lived in Panama and New Mexico and came to Baltimore at age 5. He attended Baltimore City College, graduating in 1928, and attended Johns Hopkins University, receiving his BA degree in 1932.Lorne has held engineering positions with Potomac Electric Power Co., Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, Koppers Company, and was Senior Staff Engineer with Western Electric Co. He was a member of the Johns Hopkins Club and the Mt. Washington Club. He has served as president of the Johns Hopkins Engineers Club and is at present a member of the executive committee of this club. Lorne was a member of Tau Beta Pi, Omicron Delta Kappa Leadership Society, Scabbard and Blade Military Fraternity, Delta Upsilon Social Fraternity and served as Vice-President of his class. Lorne's lacrosse playing record is outstanding. He won a varsity letter at Baltimore City College in 1928 and proceeded to win four varsity letters at Hopkins from 1929-32. He was picked on the All-American lacrosse team in 1931 and 1932. He was a member of the 1932 National Championship team and played on the 1932 Olympic Team that represented the United States in the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. This team defeated the Canadians for the Olympic championship. Lorne also played for Mt. Washington's lacrosse team for nine years and was a member of the 1937 All-Star team that toured England. This team was undefeated. He has been selected as a member of the All-Time Hopkins team as well as the All-Time Mt Washington Team. Lorne Guild passed away in March, 2008 at the age of 97.

  • John W. Boucher
    1967

    John W. Boucher

    St. John's College

    John W. Boucher

    St. John's College

    Boucher graduated from Grantsville (Md.) High School after receiving a Senatorial Scholarship from Garrett County to go to St. John's College in Annapolis. In his freshman year (1925), he went out for football practice, which had already begun. He had never seen a football or lacrosse game before attending St. John's. He lettered in football in 1926, '27, and '28. Long John played in the first lacrosse game he had ever seen, and played in every minute of every game of his college career. He was a 1929 first team All-American; the first student at St. John's ever to receive such an honor. By his senior year, he had perfected his "Long John Flip" - a move he had learned from teammate Ernie Cornbrooks in which the 210-pound defenseman flipped a dodging attackman over his knee. This obviously was a dramatic and dangerous spectacle, which was soon outlawed by a new holding rule intended to lessen the use of this move. Long John played on St. John's first national championship team in 1929. 

    After graduation in 1929, Long John accepted a position as freshman coach of football, basketball, and varsity lacrosse at Randolph-Macon College in Virginia for the season of 1929-30. In 1930 he returned to Baltimore to coach football and lacrosse and teach history at Woodbrook School. From 1931-33 he coached swimming and lacrosse and assisted in football at Tome School in Maryland. In 1930, Long John played some games for Penn Athletic Club in Philadelphia and in 1931 played for Mt. Washington Lacrosse Club. The summer of 1931 he played defense for the Cornwall Colts of the Canadian Professional Box Lacrosse League. In 1931 he played for the Baltimore Rough Riders in the newly formed professional league. The league broke up after two months with Baltimore in the lead without a loss. New Year's Day of 1930, he played an exhibition football game for the Virginia All-Stars in Richmond against the New York Giants of the National Professional Football League. Football seasons of 1930 and 1931, Long John played for Irvington Football in a semi-pro league in Baltimore. At the close of the school year of 1933, he left the coaching and teaching career to work for the fountain sales division of Coca-Cola Company.

  • Albert W. Twitchell
    1967

    Albert W. Twitchell

    Rutgers University

    Albert W. Twitchell

    Rutgers University

    A native of Dedham, Massachusetts, Twitchell attended Dean Academy before attending Rutgers. During his college years, he was an All-American defenseman, an honorable mention All-American football player, and the recipient fo the Donald Coursen Outstanding Athlete Award.Upon graduation from Rutgers in 1935, Twitchell taught and coached at North Plainfield High School, Sewanhaka High School, and Hofstra University. Two of his Sewanhaka teams won Metropolitan Interscholastic Lacrosse Titles. In 1947, Twitchell returned to Rutgers, and in 1950 he became head lacrosse coach in addition to his duties as varsity football line coach. He compiled a twelve-year record of 90-39-1, and was awarded the Morris Touchstone Coach of the Year Award in 1958 and the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association Man of the Year Award in 1962.Twitchell has been president of the USILA and USLCA, Chairman of the North/South All-Star Game, Chairman of the USILA Long-Range Planning Committee, and he is an honorary life member of the USLCA. Twitchell served as director of athletics at Rutgers from 1961-1972. He was inducted into the US Lacrosse New Jersey Chapter Hall of Fame in 1997.

  • Fred C. Linkous
    1967

    Fred C. Linkous

    University of Maryland

    Fred C. Linkous

    University of Maryland

    Linkous was born in 1905 in Tazewell County, Virginia. His family later moved to Maryland and he was subsequently educated in Harford County at Highland High School. He graduated from high school in 1924 and entered the University of Maryland in the College of Education. In 1928 he graduated from the University of Maryland with a BS degree in Education.While in high school, Fred began to show promise of his later greatness as an athlete by starring in both basketball and soccer. At the University of Maryland, Fred won his freshman numerals in football, basketball and lacrosse. He continued on in these sports, winning three varsity letters in each, making him one of a select group of Maryland athletes who won nine letters during their varsity athletic careers. In 1928 at the conclusion of Fred's senior year he was selected "In Home" on the official first lacrosse All-American team. He was voted the best senior athlete at the University of Maryland and a member of the "M" Club's All-Star Football Team, as well as guard on the All-Star Southern Conference Basketball Team. He was also captain of the University of Maryland basketball team. Fred was selected a member of Omicron Delta Kappa honorary leadership fraternity and Delta Sigma Phi social fraternity. He also served as Sergeant of Arms of the junior class and the Student Assembly in his senior year. After graduation, Fred coached football and taught at Severn School in Maryland until his untimely death from a throat infection in 1930."