• Victor J. Jenkins
    1967

    Victor J. Jenkins

    Syracuse University

    Victor J. Jenkins

    Syracuse University

    Jenkins was born in 1901 in Gas City, Indiana and attended high school in Woodlawn, Pennsylvania, where he played baseball, basketball and football. He graduated from Syracuse University's New York State College of Forestry in 1925 with a BS degree, having majored in landscape engineering. Vic played four years of varsity lacrosse at Syracuse, 1922-1925, and was a member of the undefeated United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association Championship team in 1924. He received All-American recognition at position of Out Home in 1924 and 1925, and also received the Syracuse "Block S" in both of those years. From 1926-1934 he played for the Crescent Athletic Club lacrosse team and was captain of the Crescent team in 1930. For one year he helped coach at North High School in Syracuse (1925) and officiated at several college lacrosse games in New York City (1932). He was a landscape architect with the firm of Clarence Fowler, NYC, 1925-1934, and with the state of Vermont, 1934-1935. He was also superintendent of landscape construction, Dept. of Parks, NYC, 1935-1936, supervisor of revenue producing facilities, Dept. of Parks, NYC, 1936-1945, and president of Vic Jenkins Corp., conducting NYC concessions, NYC Park Dept. 1951-1967.

  • Malcolm A. MacIntyre
    1966

    Malcolm A. MacIntyre

    Yale University

    Malcolm A. MacIntyre

    Yale University

    McIntyre was born in 1908 in Boston and was educated at the Boston Latin School 1919-1924, graduating from Newton High School in 1925. He attended Yale University, receiving his BA degree in 1929. At Yale, Mac was president of his fraternity, made Phi Beta Kappa, and held a Harkness Scholarship, as well as becoming a Rhodes Scholar. He attended Oxford University from 1930-32, receiving both a BA and his Bachelor of civil law degrees. He returned to this country and attended the Yale Law School, graduating in 1933 with a J.S.D. degree.Mac was a fine high school athlete, but did not have the opportunity to play lacrosse at that time. Upon entering Yale, Mac played freshman football in the fall and lacrosse in the spring. He won four letters at Yale, being the captain of the 1929 team, and was elected to the All-American first team in his senior year. Upon reaching Oxford, Mac continued playing lacrosse, winning three letters there, and captained the 1932 team. The 1932 team was the champion of England, and Mac organized the combination of Oxford-Cambridge team that toured the United States in 1931, playing 15 games and losing only to St. John's. Among their victories were wins over both Army and Navy. Mac had the distinction of being picked three times on the All-Star English team. Mac was an associate in the law firm of Sullivan and Cromwell from 1933 until 1942, when he entered the service as an Air Force lieutenant and reached the rank of colonel before he was demobilized in 1946. He was awarded the Legion of Merit and three Battle Stars. He became a partner of the law firm of Debevoise Plimpton Lyons & Gates and was with this firm until 1957, when he became Under-Secretary of the United States Air Force, serving for two years. Mac was president of Eastern Airlines from 1959 until 1963 and started the famous ""Air Shuttle"" between Boston-New York-Washington. He was an executive at the Martin Marietta Corporation from 1964-1972, then he practiced law until his retirement in 1987. He was a director of several large corporations, and very active in all community affairs, having been elected mayor of Scarsdale in March 1967. Mac McIntyre passed away in 1992.

  • William W. Evans
    1966

    William W. Evans

    University of Maryland

    William W. Evans

    University of Maryland

    Evans, known as 'Moon' to all his friends and admirers, attended the Business High School in Washington, D.C., graduating in 1926. He entered the University of Maryland, graduating with an BA degree in 1930, then attended George Washington University for graduate work, receiving his LLB degree in 1934. Moon won freshman letters in football, basketball, and lacrosse, going on from there to win three varsity letters in the same sport, and when he graduated in 1930, he won all of Maryland's best athlete awards, both for ability and leadership. In 1929, Moon was selected All-Maryland quarterback, All-Southern quarterback, and All-American quarterback. He was captain of basketball in 1929-30 season. His lacrosse honors were only the highest. Moon was selected as a first team All-American in 1929 and 1930. He was called the best all-around lacrosse player in the country, and in some cases, called the best player of the decade. He led the country in scoring in both his junior and senior years. He played with the U.S. All-Star lacrosse team against Canada, led the scorers in this all-star series, and was voted the most valuable player. Moon played in the Box Lacrosse League for Baltimore in 1932. His team went undefeated, and he was the high scorer. Moon practiced law in Rockville, Maryland from 1935 until his death. He enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1942, resigned as a captain in 1945, having served in action at Pelilue and Okinawa. He received a Pacific Award Commendation Badge. Bill "Moon" Evans passed away in 1963.

  • Edwin L. Lotz
    1966

    Edwin L. Lotz

    St. John's College

    Edwin L. Lotz

    St. John's College

    Lotz graduated from Ellicott City (Md.) High School in 1927, where he earned varsity letters in track and field, soccer and basketball. At St. John's College, Lotz played football and lacrosse, and paired with his brother and fellow Hall of Fame inductee, Philip, the Lotz brothers of St. John's are considered two of the greatest defensemen of all-time.In 1928, Lotz played on the baseball team at St. John's as the catcher. In 1929, the students voted to drop the baseball team and the effect was a transfer of talent to the lacrosse team, including Lotz. During his three years on the lacrosse team, the Johnnies won national championships in 1929, 1930 and 1931. Lotz was also a member of the international championship team of 1931, which won the United States - Canadian Series and the Lally International Lacrosse Trophy, now known as the Lally Cup Series. Lotz earned recognition as a first team All-American in 1930 and 1931 for the point position. He was also selected all-state in football in 1931.After graduating from St. John's, Lotz attended the Johns Hopkins University graduate engineering school and was awarded a Master's degree in 1934 and Doctor of Engineering in 1938. While attending graduate school, Lotz continued playing lacrosse for the Baltimore Athletic Club. In 1938, he helped to organize and played for the Montclair Athletic Club lacrosse team. The Associated Press did a caricature of Ed Lotz in 1931, entitled "He's Lotz of Good to Johnnies". The cartoon depicted St. John's great lacrosse and football star in his football and lacrosse gear. The caption said "one of the best athletes ever developed at the Crabtown college." In 1999, Sports Illustrated listed Ed and his brother, Phil, as two of Maryland's 50 greatest athletes of the 20th Century. Ed Lotz passed away in 2004.

  • Milton S. Erlanger
    1966

    Milton S. Erlanger

    Johns Hopkins University

    Milton S. Erlanger

    Johns Hopkins University

    Born in Baltimore in 1888 and educated at the Marston University School, Milton entered Johns Hopkins University at the age of 15. He graduated in 1907 with a Bachelor of Arts degree. While at Hopkins, Milton played lacrosse on the varsity team for three years, and after graduation commuted from New York to play on the graduate team, composed of recently-graduated Hopkins stars. The Hopkins teams of 1906 and 1907 had the best record in the United States and were champions of the Southern Division. In 1906 they beat Cornell, the Northern Division Champion. In 1915 Milton had the great honor of being chosen on the all-time Hopkins Lacrosse Team, picked by the famous coach, William C. Schmeisser. In 1915 Milton was elected to the Board of Governors of the U.S. Intercollegiate Lacrosse League and in 1916 and 1917 was its president. For many years after graduating from Hopkins, Milton officiated lacrosse games for the Intercollegiate Lacrosse League. Milton established at Hopkins, through the Johns Hopkins Club of New York, a permanent memorial for his brother, Sidney, who played on the Hopkins varsity of 1904. Each year the income from the above memorial fund is used to give an award to an outstanding Hopkins lacrosse player.During his senior year at the University, Milton became interested in social work and was in charge of a boys' club in the famous settlement house, the Maccabean House, in east Baltimore. Following graduation, and after a short apprenticeship at the Baltimore factory, he moved to New York and entered the family garment business. He became vice president and after the retirement of his brother, Sidney, was made president of the company. During his tenure a large textile business was developed. He retired from business as chairman of the board of the Erlanger Mills Corporation in 1956.Milton was quite active in civic affairs in his hometown in Oakhurst, New Jersey and Monmouth County, being extremely interested in the Humane Society and all things connected with the growth of Monmouth College. Milton Erlanger passed away in 1969.

  • Donaldson N. Kelly
    1966

    Donaldson N. Kelly

    Johns Hopkins University

    Donaldson N. Kelly

    Johns Hopkins University

    Don Kelly was born in Baltimore in 1912 and educated at the Baltimore Friends School, graduating cum laude in 1930. He attended Johns Hopkins University, receiving a BA degree in June of 1934. An outstanding athlete, at Friends School he was captain of three sports -- football, basketball, and lacrosse. He was chosen All-Maryland in both basketball and lacrosse, and his Friends School lacrosse teams of 1928 and 1929 were scholastic champions. At Hopkins, Don continued his athletic career and became one of Hopkins' all-time great sportsmen. He won eleven letters at Hopkins -- three in football and four each in basketball and lacrosse. Don won All-Maryland honors at the intercollegiate level in both basketball and lacrosse, and was chosen on the All-America lacrosse team for four straight years -- third team in 1931, second team in 1932, and first team in both 1933 and 1934. Don played on the 1932 Olympic lacrosse team and in 1937 played on the American Flannery Cup Team. 

    At Hopkins, Don's lacrosse teams were national champions in 1932, 1933, and 1934. Don was chosen captain of the 1934 All-American team and the same year became a member of the All-Time Hopkins Team. After college, Don helped form the BAC lacrosse team and played for them from 1935-41. In 1937, BAC won the Open Championship. Don coached his alma mater, Friends School, in 1936, 1937, and 1938, while working for the General Motors Corporation. In 1936 and 1937, the Friends School team won the Maryland Scholastic Championship. Don later moved to Chestertown, Maryland, and became owner and president of Don Kelly Chevrolet and Buick, Inc. He found time to coach the Washington College lacrosse team from 1958-77, and did an outstanding job, compiling a record of 161-91-1. Washington won eight Strobar (South Atlantic) Division Championships and his teams were ranked high nationally on several occasions. In 1977, Don's final year, Washington played in the NCAA Division II/III Championship Game, losing to Hobart. Don was a member of the NCAA Rules Committee and in 1966 he was selected coach of the year in lacrosse. Don was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Hall of Fame in 1995. In 1999, Sports Illustrated listed Don as one of Maryland's 50 greatest athletes of the 20th Century. Don Kelly passed away in June, 2000.

  • Avery H. Gould
    1966

    Avery H. Gould

    Dartmouth College

    Avery H. Gould

    Dartmouth College

    Born in Amityville, New York in 1907 and educated at the Manual Training High School in Brooklyn, Gould then attended the Pawling School, graduating in 1926. He entered Dartmouth College in 1926 and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1930. Red, as he was known to everyone, was an outstanding athlete. While a schoolboy, Red won letters in swimming, basketball, track, football, and lacrosse. He was captain of the Manual Training High School lacrosse team his senior year and also co-captain of the Brooklyn All-Scholastic team in 1925. Upon arriving at Dartmouth, he increased his athletic interests by adding gymnastics, where he was Eastern Intercollegiate Tumbling Champion, New England AAU Tumbling Champion, and also paddled in the International Canoe Championship in 1927. Red's lacrosse life started in the spring of 1922 with the Manual Training High School team. He played four years there, the 1923 team being the champions of its league, and Red captained the 1925 team. Upon entering Dartmouth, Red took up lacrosse immediately and played for all four years there, being captain in his senior year, and finished as one of Dartmouth's all-time great lacrosse players. He was chosen All-American in 1929 and 1930. 

    After college, Red joined the Crescent Athletic Club, and played for them from 1930-43, being captain of the 1943 team. The 1930 Crescent Team was national Open Champions. After taking three years off, Red returned to be a player/coach at the Crescent for two years, 1946 and 1947. He also played in the Box Lacrosse League in 1947. He had the great honor of being chosen by Laurie Cox as a member of the One-Time Intercollegiate Lacrosse Team from the years 1920 through 1938. Red also did two years of officiating at the high school level shortly after leaving Dartmouth. From 1942-45, he served in the United States Air Force as a staff sergeant, winning both the Commanding General's commendation and the Bronze Star in 1945, both on Guam. After graduation from Dartmouth, Red became manager of the Sheepshead Bay Canoe and Boat Company, was program director at Camp Grant for boys for several years, then joined the John Lowry Building Contractors. In 1936 he joined the Phelps-Dodge Copper Products Corporation, where he was employed until his retirement. Red Gould passed away in 2000 at the age of 92.

  • Royce N. Flippin
    1966

    Royce N. Flippin

    United States Naval Academy

    Royce N. Flippin

    United States Naval Academy

    Flippin was an outstanding athlete all through his high school, college and Naval Academy life. He attended Somerset (Ky.) High School from 1916-20. At Centre College in Kentucky, Flippin played varsity football and basketball for two years before transferring to the Naval Academy.At the Naval Academy, Flippin played four years of football, basketball, and lacrosse. His years of lacrosse at the Academy yielded two undefeated years in 1925 and 1926, with the Naval Academy winning the national championship in 1925. Playing the position of third defense, Flippin had only three goals scored against him in his three years of varsity play, all occuring during his first year. He was chosen captain of Navy's 1926 team and earned first team All-America honors in 1926. On graduation day, Flippin was awarded the Naval Academy Athletic Sword for general excellence in athletics, the highest award the Academy gives to an athlete.After leaving the Navy in 1928, he coached the Montclair Athletic Club lacrosse team in 1929 and 1930, and the basketball team from 1929-34, winning the club championship in 1934. From 1930 to 1939, Flippin was an active lacrosse official for the Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association. Flippin served on the Rules Committee of the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association for several years. After being elected as president of the USILA in 1939 and 1940, he served as one of its directors for many years. As late as 1966, Flippin helped coach the Montclair High School team, and helped greatly in the development of high school lacrosse in the state of New Jersey.Flippin was an ensign in the Navy from 1926 through 1928. He rejoined the Navy as a commander from 1942 through 1945, serving as assistant to Under Secretary James Forrestal, and commanding the Silver Star in 1944. From 1945 through 1947 he served as Executive Secretary of the Navy Ind. Association.

  • Joseph J. Julien
    1965

    Joseph J. Julien

    Rutgers University

    Joseph J. Julien

    Rutgers University

    Frenchy, as he was known to all, was born in Parry Sound, Canada, in 1907. His family moved to Brooklyn, New York, and Frenchy was educated at the Manual Training High School, graduating in 1927. He then went to Rutgers University, graduating in 1932, and followed with graduate work, getting his MA at Columbia in 1948. While in high school, Frenchy earned four letters in soccer, two in basketball, four in swimming, and four in lacrosse. In 1923, Frenchy won the coveted award in Brooklyn as the "Most Perfect Boy" in an annual contest. During Frenchy's years at Rutgers he made freshman numerals in football, basketball, swimming, and lacrosse and was captain of both the basketball and swimming team his freshman year. After his freshman year he dropped swimming, but won three letters in football, basketball, and lacrosse, captained the lacrosse team his senior year and in 1931 he was the highest scorer in the nation in lacrosse. Frenchy played midfield on the 12-man teams and switched to attack after the teams were cut to 10 men. After graduating, Frenchy played four years with the Crescent Club, and he started officiating almost immediately. He helped organize and start lacrosse in the high schools on Long Island, as well as starting and coaching a team at St. Francis College in 1934. Frenchy became district chief referee in 1956 for the New York Area and in 1958 took over as chief referee for the USILA. During his career, he did an outstanding job of organizing officials' associations and upgrading the officiating throughout the whole country. He worked more Army-Navy games and North-South games than all other officials combined. After Dinty Moore gave up editing the Lacrosse News, Frenchy took it over and ran it for five years and did an excellent job. After graduating from college, Frenchy held only two positions, working for the Bacharach Rasin Company from 1935-40, and as director of athletics at the Greenvale Country Day School on Long Island. Frenchy was a corporal in the U.S. Army from 1943-45. Frenchy was one of the outstanding lacrosse men of our generation and gave untiring efforts in working for the game in all its phases and especially in one of the most important departments, that of officiating. Frenchy Julien passed away in 1984.

  • Albert B. Heagy
    1965

    Albert B. Heagy

    University of Maryland

    Albert B. Heagy

    University of Maryland

    Born in 1906 in Rockville, Maryland, Heagy was educated at the Western High School, graduating in 1926, and at the University of Maryland, graduating with a BS degree in 1930. While in high school, Al played three years of football and basketball and captained the basketball team his senior year. At Maryland, Al made nine varsity letters -- in football, basketball, and lacrosse, and captained the lacrosse team in 1930. He was a member of the All-Maryland University lacrosse team in 1930, and also was selected on the All-American team that year. He was a member of the All-Star South football team as an end in 1930, was class president at Maryland for three years. After graduating from the University of Maryland, he started as an assistant coach and coached continually until he retired after the 1965 season. He was co-coach with Jack Faber for 25 years or more and became head coach when Faber retired after the 1963 season. During his coaching years at Maryland, the team won championships in 1936, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1955, 1956, and 1959.Al entered the state inspection service in 1930 as a chemist and had a continually rising career in the Department of Chemistry for the state. He was a member of the faculty at the University of Maryland. He was a state chemist, a job to which he was appointed in 1962. Al is a member of the state of Maryland Athletics Hall of Fame. At Maryland, he was a member of the Arts and Sciences Executive Committee, board of directors of the "M" Club, and chairman of the Scholarship Fund. He was the first executive director of the "M" Club Foundation. With all these time-consuming positions Al has managed to work steadily in his community, being a past councilman and Mayor of University Park, member of the Civil Defense Corporation, Draft Board Advisor, Prince George County Heart Association, College Park Rotary Club, Parent-Teachers Association and the Boy Scouts. He had been either chairman or president of all these organizations during his life at the University of Maryland. Al Heagy passed away in 1990.

  • Glenn N. Thiel
    1965

    Glenn N. Thiel

    Syracuse University

    Glenn N. Thiel

    Syracuse University

    Glenn "Nick" Thiel started playing lacrosse in the eighth grade, playing on sandlot and junior high school teams and playing with and against many Native Amercians from the Onondaga Reservation. While still in junior high school he played with the Syracuse Crescent Lacrosse Club. In high school Thiel played for four years at Central High School in Syracuse and served as team captain in 1929. His high school team was undefeated for the last two years. Thiel was also an outstanding football and basketball player while in high school. When he moved to Syracuse University he played freshman lacrosse under Roy Simmons Sr. and then three years of varsity under Dr. Laurie Cox. In 1932, Thiel played for Syracuse against Rutgers in the Olympic Playoff Series, and then the next year he captained the Syracuse team. Thiel also had the distinction of playing in the first intercollegiate box lacrosse game, which saw Cornell beat Syracuse 12-7 in the Rochester Armory before 6,000 spectators. 

    After leaving college, Thiel assisted Roy Simmons Sr. at Syracuse and developed, manufactured, and sold early types of face masks. As a member of the Monks Head Society he was presented the trophy for the most outstanding lacrosse player at Syracuse during his senior year. Thiel moved to Penn State as head lacrosse coach in 1935 and continued through 1956. In his 22 years of coaching he had 11 winning seasons. Thiel was a charter member of the USLCA when it was organized in 1936, vice president in 1942 and 1943, and president in 1944 and 1945. He originated and edited the Lacrosse Newsletter from 1946-51. This publication followed the Lacrosse News, which was started by Dinty Moore in 1924 and Frenchy Julien, and with the help of Peck Auer, continued its publication through 1940. Thiel was awarded the trophy as the person who had done the most for lacrosse in 1945 and 1947. He was a member of the rules committee from 1946-51, and recodified the rules book in 1948. He served two years as assistant coach of the North All-Star Team in 1941 and 1943, and was head coach in 1942, 1946, and 1949. He was elected secretary-treasurer of the Lacrosse Association in 1949 and served in that capacity through 1956. Thiel wrote an annual article for the Lacrosse Guide for nine years. He was elected to the executive board of the USILA in 1956 and served on that board through 1959. During his career at Penn State, Thiel served as head lacrosse coach, instructor of physical education, assistant professor, and was in charge of the physical training program for ASTP-AAF and the V-12 program. He also became an associate professor in 1945 and a full professor in 1950 and was appointed administrative assistant to the Dean of the College of Physical Education and Athletics in 1959. He retired from Penn State as an athletics administrator in 1974. Nick Thiel passed away in 1988.

  • Henry S. Frank
    1965

    Henry S. Frank

    Johns Hopkins University

    Henry S. Frank

    Johns Hopkins University

    Frank was born in 1887 and was one of nine children. Henry went through Baltimore's public schools and attended Baltimore City College, graduating in 1905. Henry was a member of the Bancroft Literary Society; Athletic Association; lacrosse team 1902-1905; Board of Governors of Athletic Association in 1904 and 1905; Treasurer of Class 1902 and 1903. He entered Johns Hopkins University as a member of the class of 1908. It was said, "he was a lacrosse player by vocation and a student by avocation." Henry was a member of Hopkins' varsity lacrosse team from 1906-1909, and captain of the lacrosse team in 1909. Henry is a member of the All-Time Johns Hopkins team. Upon graduation in 1908 a committee visited his father and urged him to allow Henry to remain in college an extra year to give strength to the lacrosse team. They suggested he study law, which he did. Henry captained the team and they won the national championship that year - 1909. The following year, Henry took over his father's business, "A.Frank & Sons", established by his grandfather in 1865. In 1910, Henry became active in settlement work and became a member of: Board of the Jewish Educational Alliance, 1910-1918; Board of Sinai Hospital, 1945-1953; Board of Associated Jewish Charities, 1945-46; 1949-54 President, Jewish Welfare Fund, 1949,1950; vice president, Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 1925-50. Henry Frank died in 1963.