• Jack I. Turnbull
    1965

    Jack I. Turnbull

    Johns Hopkins University

    Jack I. Turnbull

    Johns Hopkins University

    Turnbull has been called the "Babe Ruth" of lacrosse, and few, if any, could equal his playing ability. Many consider him to be the finest player they have ever seen. Billy Shriver, radio commentator, said in 1947, "Jack Turnbull is what I call the complete athlete. By that I mean when he played a game, he gave it everything he had - spiritually, mentally, physically. Although he was an individual standout, he was always the team player, always playing for the best interests of the sport." Jack was a four-time captain of lacrosse teams - Poly, 1926; Johns Hopkins, 1932; the U.S. Olympic Team, 1932; and Mt. Washington Club, 1934. He earned his bachelor's degree in engineering at Hopkins in three years and was a three-time All-American. Jack's coaches normally assigned him to close attack, but occasionally shifted him to center to get the ball on face-off. They sometimes played him at center (or midfield) to out-play the opponent and hold down the score and temporarily, at close defense to tie up the attack of the opposition (especially when an extra man developed). He dodged and scored under tremendous defensive pressure; he fed with precision; he intercepted passes from the mouth of his defenseman's stick, and used a unique hip-check to put a defenseman with the ball on the ground. He was admired and looked up to by his teammates because he performed unselfishly, rarely fouled, and his leadership, skill, character and accomplishment developed an esprit de corps and respect seldom, if ever, attained by others. 

    At Poly, Jack played halfback in football, utility man in basketball, attack in lacrosse, and was president of his senior class. At Hopkins, in addition to being class president, he participated in football and lacrosse and helped found an ice hockey team. He was selected on the All-Maryland football teams, the All-American lacrosse teams and on Father Bill Schmeisser's Honor Roll of Lacrosse Tradition. He performed in the 1928 and 1932 Olympic playoffs and was captain of the 1932 U.S. Olympic team that beat Canada two out of three games in Los Angeles in August 1932. His first team lacrosse participation at Mt. Washington began in 1928 and continued for eight years after graduation from Hopkins. The Mt. Washington Club fostered men's field hockey, tennis, an ice hockey team (1932 and 1933) and Jack participated. He was assistant lacrosse coach at Gilman School in 1934. In 1936, Jack made the U.S. Olympic Team playing men's field hockey in Berlin. The USA All-Star Lacrosse Team (including Jack) toured England in 1937, and won seven straight games. In business, he worked largely for the American Radiator Company, Baltimore Division - until World War II developed in Europe. Jack enlisted in the Maryland National Guard in 1940, becoming a second lieutenant and a pilot by the end of that year. He was promoted to First Lieutenant, Captain, Major and eventually to Lieutenant Colonel. On October 18, 1944, flying from somewhere in England, he and his squadron carried bombs to drop on industrial Germany. On the return flight, German flack downed the plane in Belgium, and the sisters of a nearby convent, with the help of older men, made caskets and temporarily buried Jack and his comrades. His remains were removed to Henri-Chappelle Cemetery. In 1947, he was permanently buried, at his mother's request, in the cemetery at All Hallows Parish in Davidsonville, Md., near his father's grave. Jack's honors included The Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal, Purple Heart and others. The Mannheim Airport was named Turnbull Field. Jack was a man of very few words and did not marry. Two lacrosse trophies are memorials attesting his prowess; the Jack Turnbull Trophy and the Turnbull-Reynolds Trophy.

  • Joseph H. Deckman
    1965

    Joseph H. Deckman

    University of Maryland

    Joseph H. Deckman

    University of Maryland

    Deckman attended Bel Air (Md.) High School and entered the University of Maryland in 1927, graduating with a BS degree in civil engineering in 1931. While in high school he ran on the track team and was a member of a relay team which set a county record. He also pitched on the softball team. Joe participated on a Bel Air town basketball team in 1926, but he ceased playing all other athletics due to illness.While at Maryland, Joe won freshman letters in basketball and lacrosse; he played three years of varsity lacrosse, winning letters in his junior and senior years; played two years of varsity football, winning a letter as a tackle in his senior year. In lacrosse in his senior year (1931), he was unanimous selection for position of Point on the Spalding Official All-America lacrosse first team. He was named defense captain of the Baltimore American Newspaper All-American Team in 1931. Joe was selected as Best Bet on the Sunpapers All-Maryland Team in 1931. Joe was voted best senior athlete, Class of 1931 at the University of Maryland, and selected as a member of the 12-man University of Maryland all-star lacrosse team. He was awarded the Charles Linhart Athletic Acheivement Ring in 1931. He was voted captain of lacrosse at the end of the 1931 season, and he served as president of the senior class. He assisted as a volunteer coach for defense at Maryland in 1932, and in 1933, he coached an undefeated Maryland freshman team. From 1933 to 1956 he scouted off and on for the lacrosse team. In 1932 Joe played quarterback for the unlimited class Champion Mohawk A.C. Football Team of the District of Columbia. 

    In 1936 Joe managed, coached and played for the Maryland team in the Baltimore Sports Arena Box Lacrosse League. In 1936 he played defense for the Tri-City team in the Mt. Washington Box Lacrosse League. In 1937 he played first defense for the Baltimre Athletic Club lacrosse team. This team enjoyed an undefeated season and won the National Open Lacrosse Championship. In 1939 he helped to organize the Washington Athletic Association. From 1939 to 1941, Joe coached, managed and played close attack on the W.A.A. lacrosse team. In 1950-51 Joe served as president of the University of Maryland "M" Club. During his tenure of office, he instituted the annual "M" Club athletic dinner. In 1956, Joe helped initiate the Maryland Athletics Hall of Fame. For the first four years Joe served as the chairman of the Hall of Fame selection committee. Beginning in 1958 he became co-donor of the Deckman-Silber Lacrosse Award to the Most Improved Defenseman on the University of Maryland lacrosse squad each year. Joe served on the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation beginning in 1959, and was president of the Lacrosse Foundation in 1967 and 1968. Joe Deckman passed away in 1969.

  • Philip E. Lamb
    1965

    Philip E. Lamb

    Swarthmore College

    Philip E. Lamb

    Swarthmore College

    Lamb was born in Baltimore in 1884 and played four years of lacrosse at Swarthmore in the days when Swarthmore and Johns Hopkins were the perennial national champs. He was a star for the national championship teams of 1904 and 1905. At Swarthmore, Lamb also played football and was captain of the 1905 relay team that won the mile championship at the Penn Relays. In 1905, Lamb also starred as center for the new Mt. Washington Club team by commuting from Philadelphia to Baltimore. Lamb was picked by Walter Oster Norris (whose name is synonymous with Mt. Washington Club lacrosse) as one of the greatest lacrosse centers of all time. For his 10 years of playing for Mt. Washington, he was named one of the five men most responsible for instituting lacrosse at Mt. Washington. Lamb was chosen on the first list of those selected for the Mt. Washington Lacrosse Honor Roll.Lamb was an ardent supporter of youth athletics. As head of the governing committee of the Baltimore Friends School, he provided guidance, which made Friends outstanding in prep school athletics and consistently a leader in lacrosse. His service as a member of the board of the Towson YMCA was recognized by the naming of one of their playing fields in his honor. Following his graduation from Swarthmore, Lamb attended the University of Maryland Law School, and later organized a real estate firm under his name which developed Cedarcroft, Pinehurst, Wiltondale and Coventry. He was a member of the Real Estate Brokers Round Table, member of the board of the Towson YMCA, Friends School, Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital, and the Arlington Federal Savings and Loan Association and was a charter member of the North Baltimore Kiwanis.

  • Frank G. Breyer
    1964

    Frank G. Breyer

    Johns Hopkins University

    Frank G. Breyer

    Johns Hopkins University

    Born in 1886 in Baltimore, Breyer attended Baltimore City College and Johns Hopkins University. He graduated from Hopkins in 1908 with an BA degree and in 1910 a MS degree. In 1952, he received an honorary Doctor of Engineering degree from Clarkson College. At City College, he played lacrosse for three years. While at Johns Hopkins he played on four intercollegiate lacrosse champion teams. In addition, he was South Atlantic Cross Country champion. He co-founded and served as the first coach of the U.S. Naval Academy lacrosse team. He also at spent time coaching at Lehigh and Swarthmore Colleges. In business, as a chemist, he was chief chemist for the New Jersey Zinc Company of Pennsylvania and director of research for the Zinc Company of New York. He was a partner in Singmaster and Breyer and served as chairman of Chemical Enterprises. Frank Breyer passed away in 1966.

  • 1964

    Claxton J. O'Connor

    St. John's College

    Claxton J. O'Connor

    St. John's College

    Claxton "Okey" O'Connor was born in Baltimore in 1907 and attended Baltimore Poly from 1922-26 and spent one year at Loyola College, 1926-27. From there, he went to St. John's College in Annapolis from 1927-30, and graduated in 1930 from St. John's with a B.A. degree. At Baltimore Poly, he played on MSA lacrosse championship teams in 1925 and 1926. At St. John's, he won his varsity lacrosse letter in 1928 and 1930 when they won the national championship. He did not letter in 1929 due to a broken ankle. At Poly, he also ran varsity track and played varsity football and was captain of the 1925 team. In college he played varsity football at Loyola and St. John's. He was a mathematics teacher, football, basketball and lacrosse coach and athletics director at Boys' Latin School in Baltimore from 1930 to 1960. From 1961 through 1976, he was a mathematics teacher and lacrosse coach at Glen Burnie High School in Maryland. After he retired, he continued coaching youth lacrosse in Glen Burnie through 1991. Okey's activities in lacrosse did not stop at that level. He served on the following USILA committees: Chairman of USILA Committee Man of the Year Award, 1962; Lacrosse Guide Committee 4 years; member of the USILA Executive Board for two years; and USILA Development Committee member for two years. Also, he was USLCA vice president,1952-53; USLCA president, 1954-55 and chairman of USLCA Publicity Committee since 1955 and for several years had been a director of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. For many years he wrote articles on the game of lacrosse. He was editor and publisher of the annual Six-Man Football Magazine from 1946-58. Also, he was part owner and corporation secretary for Boys' Latin School of Baltimore from 1935 until the corporation liquidated in 1960. Okey was one of the truly dedicated leaders that the game has known, and also the developer of many outstanding lacrosse players. Okey O'Connor passed away in 1991.

  • Henry F. Baker
    1964

    Henry F. Baker

    Swarthmore College

    Henry F. Baker

    Swarthmore College

    Baker, or Fenny, was educated at the Friends School in Baltimore, where he graduated in 1915. He then went on to Swarthmore College from 1915-17. Fenny played lacrosse for the Mt. Washington Club teams from 1905 through 1929, participating with the Midget, Junior and Senior teams and was also team captain in 1921. He played lacrosse for Swarthmore College in 1916. In addition to lacrosse, he helped start football at Friends School in 1913 and was captain and halfback that year. In 1914, Friends won the prep school championship. He was also a regular on the Swarthmore team in 1915 and 1916. He played four years of basketball and baseball and was captain of each team. In 1915, he was elected to Sunpapers Scholastic Hall of Fame.Fenny's interest in lacrosse did not stop as a player. He officiated in the Southern College Division from 1917-1935. During this period, he was chief referee for the district for five years.In addition to operating his own business for many years, his other business experience included sales of securities, maintenance manager for Eastwick Motor Company, fuel manager for several local companies, and branch manager for Eutaw Savings Bank of Baltimore.In 1917, he enlisted in the service and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. He went overseas in 1918 with the 58th Artillery C.A.C., being discharged in 1919 as a first lieutenant. He was reappointeed a captain in 1942 and served in California through 1946. Fenny Baker passed away in February, 1986.

  • Miller Moore
    1964

    Miller Moore

    University of Pennsylvania

    Miller Moore

    University of Pennsylvania

    Moore was born in Kansas City, Missouri in 1905 and he was educated at Erasmus Hall High School, graduating in 1924 and the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1928 with a BS in economics. In lacrosse, Miller played four years in high school, being captain his senior year and first team All- Scholastic New York City in 1923 and 1924. At the University of Pennsylvania, he was captain of the freshman lacrosse team and played 3 years of varsity lacrosse. He was team captain in 1928, made the All-American Team in 1928 and was leading scorer. In addition, he played end on the football team both at Erasmus and the University of Pennsylvania. Following college, he was assistant playing-coach and a regular at the Crescent Club for 6 years. As an official, he officiated many high school, college and club games from 1928 to 1939. This included being head referee for 6 annual Army-Navy games.He was treasurer, vice-president and president of the USILA from 1930 to 1936. He also served on various rules, nominating and referee committees. It was during this period that the number of players was changed from 12 to 10 and the field reduced from 120 to 100 yards. Also he organized and played in the first North-South tournament, June 1934 in Brooklyn. As president of the USILA, he took an All-American Team for an eight game tour of Canada including the last Lally Trophy matches in 1935.Miller spent over 35 years in the banking business. He was vice president of the Bankers Trust Company in New York. Also, he was a director of the National Re-Insurance Company, Pouch Terminal and Trustee of the American Youth Hotels. Miller Moore passed away in 1972.

  • Francis L. Kraus
    1964

    Francis L. Kraus

    Hobart College

    Francis L. Kraus

    Hobart College

    Born in Fulton, New York in 1899, Kraus attended Fulton High School and Dean Academy. He also attended Colgate University from 1920-21 and Hobart College in Geneva, New York from 1921-24, graduating in 1924 with a B.S. degree.At Fulton High School and Dean Academy, he played varsity football, basketball and baseball. At Colgate, he was a varsity football letterman in 1920 and won his freshman basketball numerals in 1921. At Hobart, he was a varsity football letterman for three years, varsity basketball letterman for three years and varsity lacrosse letterman for two years. He was captain of the 1923 football team, 1924 basketball team and a lacrosse All-American in 1924. In addition, he was on the New York State Small College All-Star team in football in 1922 and 1923 and played in the Buffalo All-American Professional League in 1924 and in basketball on the New York State All-Star team in 1924. Babe's coaching history at Hobart College includes varsity and freshman football, varsity and freshman basketball, varsity and freshman lacrosse, and varsity baseball. In addition, he was on the North coaching staff for the North/South games in 1942, 1947 and 1954. He coached at Hobart for 40 years, and his teams won 207, lost 120, and tied 5.Kraus' long list of activities for the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association include: Executive Board, 1932, 1933, 1960, 1961 and 1962; Rules Committee, 1945 and 1946; NCAA Lacrosse Rules Committee, 1945 and 1946; Advisory Rules Committee, 1963 and 1964; Development of Lacrosse Committee, 1939; All-American Committee, 1941; All-American Advisory Committee, 1952, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1965, and 1966; Nominating Committee, 1962 and 1963; Man of the Year Award Committee, 1963 and 1964. In addition to coaching duties, Babe's athletic interest at Hobart included graduate manager of athletics from 1931 to 1963, and director of athletics from 1932 to 1963. Babe Kraus passed away in 1966.

  • 1964

    Roy D. Simmons

    Syracuse University

    Roy D. Simmons

    Syracuse University

    Roy Simmons, Sr. was born in 1901 in Philadelphia and attended Hyde Park High School in Chicago and later, Syracuse University, graduating in 1925. In high school, Roy played football, basketball, baseball and was on the track team. At Syracuse, he played varsity football, organized the boxing team, and played varsity lacrosse. He was captain of the freshman football team in 1921, the varsity football team in 1924 and won the "Most Valuable Football Player Award" in 1924. Playing varsity lacrosse in 1924 and 1925, he played every minute of all games for both years that Syracuse was national champion.His coaching history included backfield coach at Syracuse immediately following graduation. In 1959, the football team won the national championship. As varsity boxing coach, his teams won 14 Eastern Championships. Roy coached varsity lacrosse from 1931 through 1970. His coaching record was 253 wins, 130 losses. He was on the North coaching staff for the annual North/South games in 1946, 1952, 1954 and 1963. He was head coach in 1954 and 1963. In addition to coaching, Roy was been a member of the NCAA Rules Committee on two occasions while connected with the USILA. Roy Simmons, Sr. passed away in 1994.

  • Thomas W. Collins
    1964

    Thomas W. Collins

    Yale University

    Thomas W. Collins

    Yale University

    Born in 1898 in Stanford, Connecticut, Collins was educated in the public high school in Wallingford and at Choate School in Wallingford, graduating in 1918. He attended Yale College and graduated in 1923 with a BA degree. He is also a graduate of the School of Banking, Rutgers University, receiving his Certificate of Banking in 1948.Known as Collie, he played for Yale varsity in 1921, 1922, and 1923 and was elected captain of the team in his senior year. He was honorable mention All-American 1923 and played for the Crescent Athletic Club lacrosse team in 1925 and 1926. Collie helped coach the Yale freshmen in 1923 and from 1923 to 1933 was an official high school and freshman referee in New Haven, Stanford and White Plains. In 1955, he became the donor of the Collins Bowl for the outstanding player of the year on the Yale lacrosse team. Also, he has been responsible for having adequate newspaper coverage for Yale lacrosse games by providing publicity for the games throughout the state of Connecticut.His business experience includes Clinton Gilbert & Co., New York City, Investments, 1925 to 1940; U.S. Marine Corps, 1941 -1946; vice president Guaranty Fund, Hartford, 1946 to 1947; vice president of the New Haven Savings Bank, New Haven, 1947 to 1963. Since 1963, he has been connected with Blyth & Co., Investments in New York City. His military service includes sniper - 1st Battalion Fighting 69th New York 1917-1919, participating in five engagements and colonel in Word War II, USO Marine Corps. His decorations include the Oak Leaf Cluster, Silver Star and Purple Heart. He retired in 1958 as a full colonel.

  • Edwin E. Powell
    1964

    Edwin E. Powell

    University of Maryland

    Edwin E. Powell

    University of Maryland

    Powell was born in 1889 in Baltimore and was educated at Baltimore City College and the University of Maryland, graduating in 1913 with a BS in civil engineering. In lacrosse, he played for the Mt. Washington Juniors, 1904-07, the University of Maryland, 1909-13, and the Mt. Washington Seniors, 1911-12. He won his letter in lacrosse at Maryland from 1910-13 and also the tennis championship at Maryland, 1912 to 1913. His most important contribution to lacrosse at the University of Maryland was that he organized and coached the first lacrosse team in 1910. The University of Maryland class of 1913 had made an annual award known as the "Powell Lacrosse Award" to the outstanding player for meritorious service in the advancement of lacrosse in Maryland. After graduating from Maryland, he was connected with the highway construction in Maryland, building construction in New York City and Connecticut, was Office Manager and Salesman for Mack Trucks, an engineer for the U.S. Bureau of Public Transport and Survey in Pennsylvania and Chicago, Sales Engineer for Black & Decker, Sales Engineer for Loadometer Corp., and, beginning in 1956, he was president of the Stoneleigh Bowling Center, Inc., duck pin bowling lanes in Baltimore. He enlisted in the 23rd Engineers, December 1917 and was promoted to Master Engineer February 1918. In 1918, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and promoted to 1st Lieutenant in 1919. He was discharged July 1919. Edwin Powell passed away at age 96.

  • John E. Faber
    1963

    John E. Faber

    University of Maryland

    John E. Faber

    University of Maryland

    Born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania in 1903, Faber graduated from Eastern High School in Washington D.C. in 1921, University of Maryland with BS in 1926, MS in 1927, PhD in 1937. After graduating from Maryland in 1926, Jack remained in the educational field all of his life at the University of Maryland. He was head of the Department of Microbiology, as well as faculty chairman of athletics. Jack's athletic career at Maryland was outstanding, he won three letters in football, four in basketball and three in lacrosse. He was captain of the basketball team for two years, 1924-1925. He was captain of the lacrosse team in 1926 and a third team All-American in 1927 and an honorable mention in 1926. Dr. Faber's coaching career started shortly after graduating from Maryland and concluded at the end of the 1963 lacrosse season, with exception of a four-year break 1942-1946 when Jack held the rank of major during World War II. During this career, Jack coached not only lacrosse but had his success in football and basketball as well. His overall lacrosse coaching record is 255 wins, 59 losses, 2 ties, all at he University of Maryland. His teams won the national championship in 1936-39-40-55-56, were co-champions in 1937 and 1959. Jack also coahced the All Star Teams in 1940-46-56. In 1959 Jack was awarded the Coach of the Year Award. Jack Faber passed away in 1994.