• Ferris Thomsen
    1963

    Ferris Thomsen

    St. John's College

    Ferris Thomsen

    St. John's College

    Born in Baltimore in 1907, Thomsen was educated at Baltimore Friends School, graduating in 1926. He then went to Swarthmore College for two years before transferring to St. John's (Md.) College. While at Friends School, Thomsen played football, basketball and lacrosse, winning varsity letters in all three sports. At Swarthmore College, he played two years of football and lacrosse, once scoring 14 goals during a lacrosse game versus Lafayette College. At St. John's College, he also won letters in lacrosse and football and played on the 1929 national championship lacrosse team. After college, Thomsen played four years with the Mt. Washington Club. Taking up coaching as a career, Thomsen coached from 1930-34 at McDonogh School, then on to Gilman School from 1934-45, where besides coaching, he was also director of athletics for the last six years. In 1945 Thomsen moved to the University of Pennsylvania where he coached lacrosse and football until moving to Princeton University. He coached at Princeton from 1951 to 1970, and it was here that his lacrosse teams won two national championships and 10 Ivy League titles. He won national championships in 1951 and 1953. Thomsen was named Coach-of-the-Year by the USILA in 1967, and he coached the South team in the annual collegiate North-South game in 1950. In addition to his coaching accolades, Thomsen served an active lacrosse official for 16 years and served several terms as president of the officials association. He held various positions on many committees for the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association and was a former president of the United States Lacrosse Coaches' Association. Ferris Thomsen passed away in 1994.

  • Thomas N. Biddison
    1963

    Thomas N. Biddison

    Johns Hopkins University

    Thomas N. Biddison

    Johns Hopkins University

    Born in Baltimore in 1908, Biddison graduated Baltimore City College High School in 1924; Johns Hopkins University in 1928 with an BA degree, then from the University of Maryland Law School in 1931. Tom spent his whole life in the practice of law and civic affairs in Baltimore and the State of Maryland. He became a leading political figure, being successively assistant states attorney, chairman of the board and director of the Maryland Department of Correction, and the city solicitor of Baltimore 1947-58. Tom was a fine athlete in high school winning letters in football as well as in lacrosse. At Hopkins, Tom played football, where he won All-Maryland honors and was a four-year letterman in lacrosse playing on three national championship teams (1926-27-28). Tom was an All-American lacrosse player for three years and is the only player in history to make the All-America team at both close defense and then close attack. He is a member of the All-Time Hopkins Lacrosse Team and the 1928 U.S Olympic team. After leaving Hopkins, Tom coached for three years at Baltimore Friends School. Tom died in 1958 and was posthumously inducted into the Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

  • Harry E. Wilson
    1963

    Harry E. Wilson

    United States Military Academy

    Harry E. Wilson

    United States Military Academy

    Harry "Lighthorse" Wilson began his lacrosse career at Penn State, where he was one of the greatest all-time athletes of the institution, earning All-American honors and varsity letters in football and basketball. Wilson transferred to West Point in 1924, where he earned 12 varsity letters in lacrosse, basketball and football, which stands as a record. He was selected first team All-American in 1926 and earned second team honors in 1925 and 1927. He earned All-American honors in football in 1926 and first team All-American honors in basketball in 1927. Upon graduation in 1928, he won two sabres: one as captain of the 1927 football team and one as outstanding athlete of the Academy. Wilson became the assitant backfield coach for Army in 1930; he also coached various football, basketball and track teams during his Army career. Wilson, commanding the 42nd bomber group in the South Pacific, flew 48 combat missions during WWII from March 1943 to December 1944. Among his many WWII decorations, he holds the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal with six oak leaf clusters. Harry Wilson passed away in 1990.

  • Fred C. Alexander
    1963

    Fred C. Alexander

    Harvard University

    Fred C. Alexander

    Harvard University

    Alexander attended Boys' High School in Brooklyn, graduating in 1906. He then went to Harvard University, graduating cum laude in history and government in 1910. While in high school, Fred played both lacrosse and ice hockey where he won his letters in both sports, and was elected captain his senior year of both the lacrosse and hockey teams. Additionally, Fred was a baseball player, a member of the rifle team, and participated in all other types of sports. At Harvard, Fred was captain of his freshman team, then on to three years of varsity play, winning letters all three years and was elected captain his senior year of the 1910 team. The 1908 team won the Intercollegiate Championship, the 1909 team tied for the championship, and the 1910 team won the Northern Intercollegiate Championship. Fred's normal position was center, but on occasion he played every position, including goalie. After leaving Harvard, Fred played 12 years for the Boston Lacrosse Club and was captain of the 1923 team. Fred not only played for Harvard, but also did most of the coaching of the teams and also helped coach the Rindge Tech High School in Cambridge in 1909. After graduating from Harvard, Fred taught math and physics at Framingham High School, and then went into business with the L.S. Drake, Co. in Massachusetts, where he worked until 1928, becoming one of the vice-presidents and factory managers. Fred then moved to the Johnson-Appleby Co., where he was factory superintendent and salesman until 1951.

  • Robert B. Pool
    1963

    Robert B. Pool

    St. John's College

    Robert B. Pool

    St. John's College

    Pool began his lacrosse career with the Mount Washington Juniors from 1921-23. He continued playing at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute where he was a member of its championship teams of 1924-27.Pool played for St. John's College in Annapolis from 1928-32. The Johnnies, not yet members of the USILA, won the national open championship in 1929 with a 13-0 record. Pool was selected as an Honorable Mention All-American that same year. St. John's joined the USILA at the end of the 1929 season, and in 1930, after outscoring their opponents 102-13, earned the distinction of USILA national champion. Pool was awarded first team All-America honors in 1930. Undefeated again in 1931, the Johnnies repeated as USILA champions and also won the Lally Cup Series between Canada and the U.S. As team captain of the 1931 Johnnies, Pool led the USILA in scoring and earned First-Team All-America honors again in 1931. He scored four of the five goals that led St. John's over Canada in the 1931 Lally Cup Series.Pool played professional box lacrosse in Canada in 1931-32. He returned to Baltimore and played for the newly-formed American Box Lacrosse League in 1932, the only season the league existed.Pool began his coaching career at Harvard University in 1932, defeating Yale for the first time in 17 years. He also coached for two-year periods at Poly and the Friends School in Baltimore.Pool designed, manufactured, and patented lacrosse helmets and sticks to improve the skills of players. He designed a double-wall stick, "The Bobby Pool Special," and an earless helmet in the late 1930s. His stick design became a concept model for the double wall plastic sticks approved for use by the NCAA in 1971. Bobby Pool passed away in 1991.

  • Carl Hartdegen
    1963

    Carl Hartdegen

    Lehigh University

    Carl Hartdegen

    Lehigh University

    Hartdegen was born in 1889 in Newark, New Jersey and educated at Barringer High School, then at Newark Academy, graduating in 1910. Carl went on to Lehigh University, where he received his degree in civil engineering in 1914.During his years at Lehigh, Carl played basketball as well as lacrosse. He developed into one of Lehigh's all-time great lacrosse players and captained the 1914 team. During these years, Lehigh had one of the top teams in the country and in 1914 tied for the national championship. Carl was also very active in many other extracurricular activities other than lacrosse. After graduating, Carl played for many years with the Crescent Lacrosse Club and was one of the greatest defensemen of all time. Carl's first job after graduating from Lehigh was working on the construction of the Holland Tunnel. Then he was connected with the Mortgage and Loan Division of the Prudential Insurance Company in Newark, New Jersey.During World War I, Carl was a First Lt. in the 318th Engineers. Carl Hartdegen died in May, 1963.

  • Jason G. Stranahan
    1963

    Jason G. Stranahan

    Union College

    Jason G. Stranahan

    Union College

    Stranahan was born in 1906 in Oneonta, N.Y., and he was educated at Cherry Valley High School, 1923-26, then on to Union (N.Y.) College, graduating with a BA degree in 1930. He received his Master's degree from New York University in 1937. Stranahan was a fine all-around athlete both in school and college winning letters in football, basketball and baseball in high school, and football, track and lacrosse at Union. Stranahan was an outstanding midfielder at Union where he played on the 1929 Intercollegiate National Champion team. After college Stranahan continued his athletic career by playing club football and lacrosse for many years in the New York area and also played in the short lived Professional Box Lacrosse League for both the New York Yankees and Toronto. In addition to officiating high school, college and club lacrosse, Stranahan was a multiple sport coach (lacrosse 1935-55), physical education teacher, and director of athletics at Manhasset High School on Long Island. He was editor of the Metropolitan and Long Island Scholastic Lacrosse Association annual report for four years and spent 12 years as a member of the USILA development committee. A sergeant in the 101st Infantry, Stranahan served his country overseas with great distinction from 1942-45. Jay married Erma Bethel in 1933, and they had one son, John L. Stranahan. Jay Stranahan passed away in 1999.

  • William K. Morrill
    1962

    William K. Morrill

    Johns Hopkins University

    William K. Morrill

    Johns Hopkins University

    Morrill was born in Baltimore in 1903 and attended Baltimore City College, graduating in 1921. He attended Johns Hopkins University, receiving a BA degree in 1925, MA degree in 1927, and a PhD in 1929. Kelso became an associate professor of mathematics in 1950 and was appointed to be dean of students in 1959 - a position he held until his retirement in 1967. At Hopkins, he won four letters in lacrosse. The 1925 team won the silver medal and the 1926 and 1927 teams were both national champions. After finishing his college career, he played for the Mt. Washington Club and the Baltimore Olympic Club, and started his coaching career at the old Marstons School. He also coached at Park School and Towson High School before becoming affiliated with the coaching staff at Johns Hopkins. The 1932, 1933, 1934, 1941 and 1950 teams were national champions. Kelso was one of the most active members of the USILA in the history of the association. He coached for 25 years, officiated for 10 years, and served as president of the Southern Lacrosse Officials Association for one year. He also served as chairman of the following USILA committees: All-American Committee, 1956-58; Coach of the Year Committee, 1960-81; Championship Committee, 1960-62; Film Committee. He was a member of the executive board of the USILA and also a member of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation. He served on the Rules Committee on several occasions. At the time of his death, Kelso was chairman of the Championship Awards Committee, a position that he had held since 1960. He coached several all-star prep school teams and served as head coach of the North-South Game. Kelso directed two educational films, "How to Play Lacrosse", and "Fouls of Lacrosse." He participated in making "File 7," a television picture on Hopkins lacrosse. In 1953 he received the trophy awarded to the man who had done the most for lacrosse. He also received the Kelly Post Award for the Baltimore Citizen who has contributed a great deal to lacrosse over the years. He is the author of a book called "Lacrosse", which was published by the Barnes Company in 1951. Kelso Morrill passed away in 1968.

  • Harland W. Meistrell
    1962

    Harland W. Meistrell

    Princeton University

    Harland W. Meistrell

    Princeton University

    Meistrell, better known as Tots, was educated in Brooklyn and graduated from Erasmus Hall High School in 1919 where he helped organize the school's first lacrosse team in 1916. He was captain of the 1919 team. In 1920, Tots went to Rutgers University and played on the varsity football team as a freshman. His outstanding ability gave him the opportunity to reorganize lacrosse at Rutgers by setting up a team and coaching. In 1921 Tots transferred to Princeton University, where he organized, assisted in coaching and arranged a schedule of games. This was the first lacrosse team at Princeton since 1883. In 1958, "The Tots Meistrell Bowl" was awarded to the winner of the annual Rutgers-Princeton lacrosse game for the first time. After leaving Princeton, Tots played for the Crescent Athletic Club, helped organize and coach the squadron "C" Cavalry team, and played in many club games including the Olympic trials in 1932. Tots was one of the original organizers of the Metropolitan Lacrosse Association and was its first president. He officiated for ten years, coached for eight and was an active player over a period of nineteen years. After his college life at Princeton , Tots went on to get a law degree from St. John's University in Brooklyn. Tots' main occupations were as a real estate broker, and owner and director of the Great Neck Dog Training Center, a world renowned dog training school. Tots has written and published many articles and books on the subject of dog training. Tots Meistrell passed away in 1963.

  • Walter O. Norris
    1962

    Walter O. Norris

    St. John's College

    Walter O. Norris

    St. John's College

    Walter Oster Norris, better known as "Kid," attended Friends School in Baltimore where he won letters and was an outstanding athlete in football, basketball, and tennis. He left Friends in 1923 and entered St. John's College in Annapolis where he was on the football team. Norris left St. John's in 1924 to become a partner in his father's automotive business, R. W. Norris & Sons. It was after leaving St. John's that Norris started his long and illustrious association with the Mt. Washington Club. At that time, Mt.Washington fielded football, baseball and tennis, as well as lacrosse teams. Norris played and starred on all these teams, as a third baseman and a .300 hitter on the baseball team, at quarterback on the football team, and was always high on the club tennis ladder. In spite of all these accomplishments in other sports, he had time to become one of the finest midfielders in the history of lacrosse. Norris played and coached lacrosse at Mt. Washington for 30 years. For the 15 years he played, Mt. Washington won 110 games out of 119 played, and after he started coaching in 1938, Mt. Washington won the Open Championship eight times. In 1937 Norris was a member of an all-star team that toured England and was undefeated. He also was honored as captain of this team for their first game.Although Norris concentrated on lacrosse he did not neglect other forms of athletic endeavor. He played and coached the Mt. Washington Club's men's field hockey team with such success that several members of the team were selected to represent the United States in three Olympiads. In 1940 Norris was a member of the Olympic Selection Committee for field hockey and helped coach this team. He was also very active in badminton, winning the Maryland State Men's Doubles Championship in 1944 with another great lacrosse player, Fred Stieber. In addition Norris enjoyed duck shooting and was very active as a yachtsman during the summers.Norris was a very strong leader and influenced the lives of a great many of the young men with whom he played and also coached. The new Mt. Washington Club is a fitting memorial to one who devoted so much time and effort into making it one of the outstanding influences in the game of lacrosse down through the years. Kid Norris passed away in November, 1958.

  • Henry C. Ford
    1962

    Henry C. Ford

    Swarthmore College

    Henry C. Ford

    Swarthmore College

    Born in Buffalo, New York in 1904, Henry Ford attended Port Allegheny (Pa.) High School and then graduated from Swarthmore College in 1927. He then earned a Master's degree in education at Temple University.After graduating, Hank started teaching and coaching as a profession. His coaching started by helping Tom Strobhar at Swarthmore College for two years; then on to the University of Pennsylvania as freshman coach until 1934. When he returned to Swarthmore in 1935, he assisted Avery Blake until the 1943 season. He again returned to Swarthmore as assistant coach in 1959 and then in 1960 he went to the University of Pennsylvania as freshman coach. In 1946, Hank started lacrosse at Lower Merion High school where he was head coach through the 1958 season, and produced many fine teams and players. In 1931, Hank started, coached, and equipped a boys' lacrosse club in Chester, Pennsylvania that continued to play through 1945. In 1945, he started and coached a boys' lacrosse club in Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania, and in 1958 organized and coached a girls' lacrosse club.Hank had never played lacrosse before coming to Swarthmore College, and while there, became an outstanding midfielder on some of Swarthmore's best teams. He continued to play lacrosse after graduating at the Penn Athletic Club. As a member of the box lacrosse team at Swarthmore, Hank was an outstanding center for many years. He refereed for a period of fifteen years and was district chief referee in the Pennsylvania area and a member of the Development Committee for lacrosse for many years.Hank's whole life was devoted to teaching and working with children, and besides his many ventures in lacrosse, he was a social studies teacher for many years. He was a counselor at a boys' camp for twenty-three summers, and a playground supervisor for ten summers. He was a past president of the Teachers' Association and a leader in the community. Hank Ford passed away in 1986.

  • Douglas C. Turnbull
    1962

    Douglas C. Turnbull

    Johns Hopkins University

    Douglas C. Turnbull

    Johns Hopkins University

    Turnbull played 20 consecutive years of lacrosse, three for Poly, four for Hopkins, and 13 for the Mt. Washington Club. He played every position on the team with distinction, except goalie. He was a four time All-American. Born in Baltimore in 1903, he attended public schools, including Baltimore Polytechnic, graduating in 1921. He then moved on to Johns Hopkins University, where he received a BE Degree in 1924, followed by a year of graduate work in thermodynamics, mathematics, and engineering. While at Poly, Doug played football and basketball as well as lacrosse and was picked for the All-Scholastic football team of 1920. He was captain of the 1921 Poly lacrosse team. There were only two high school lacrosse teams, Poly and City, and their schedules included some colleges. In Doug's three lacrosse years at Poly, their teams defeated City three out of four games, and the varsity of Penn and Maryland, and tied St. John's. At Hopkins, Doug played football all four years and received All-Maryland selections three years. In 1923 he was awarded the Evening Sun Medal and led the country in place kicking with 6 field goals, 15 points after touchdowns, and was selected on Van Orman's All-Time Hopkins Football Team. Hopkins' football team played Princeton, Cornell, Pittsburgh and others, including Maryland. In lacrosse, Doug made first team All-American as a close attack for four straight years - 1922-25 - and he captained the 1924 and 1925 teams. Hopkins was champion of the Southern Division of the ILA in 1923 and 1924 and in 1924 Doug made Father Bill Schmeisser's Honor Roll of Hopkins Lacrosse Tradition. Doug played against Oxford-Cambridge Onondaga Indians, Mt. Washington and the top colleges. Doug was twice president of ODK leadership fraternity, 1924 and 1925, president of Johns Hopkins Engineers 1948 and 1949, Alumni Trustee 1956-62, and national chairman of Alumni (Homewood) fund raising beginning in 1960.

    After college, Doug played 13 more years at the Mt. Washington Club until 1938 and was assistant coach for two years thereafter. Mt. Washington was open champion, 1927 through 1935. Doug captained the 1930 team. The club had an ice hockey team and Doug managed it in 1932 and 1933. In 1934 Doug coached lacrosse at Gilman School. Doug did some occasional scouting for Hopkins, Mt. Washington and Army. He infrequently helped Morris Touchstone, coach at Army at his request. Doug was speaker at the 75th anniversary of the USILA, December 14, 1957, and became a director in 1961 of Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation.Doug was employed by the Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, 1925-1943, and he joined the Executive Department of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company in 1943. He was Chairman of the Locomotive Development Committee, and was a trustee of the Maryland Academy of Sciences. Doug Turnbull passed away in 1996.