• Fred C. Billing
    1962

    Fred C. Billing

    United States Naval Academy

    Fred C. Billing

    United States Naval Academy

    Billing, United States Naval Academy Class of 1925, became the first Navy player to be elected to the Hall of Fame. Billing began his lacrosse career at Erasmus Hall in Brooklyn from 1914-18. After completing high school, Billing attended Princeton University from 1919-21 and the U.S. Naval Academy from 1921-25.Billing was selected as a first team All-American for the position of close attack in 1923, 1924, and 1925. Billing was one of the greatest dodgers of all time and a fine stick-handler in the days when stick-work did not have the universal perfection it has today. In addition to playing lacrosse, Billing played football, hockey and tennis. In his graduation year at the Academy, he received a letter of Commendation and was awarded the coveted Thompson Cup for his athletic ability.Billing participated as a lacrosse player for 21 years, starring for the Crescent Athletic Club and Montclair Athletic Club lacrosse teams after his Academy years. He coached for two years and officiated for five. Billing was active in promoting lacrosse among prep schools in New Jersey. Billing was a commander in the Naval Reserve from 1941-46 and received area and combat ribbons. Toward the close of World War II, he was recalled to the Naval Academy as the Officer Representative for Lacrosse. Fred Billing passed away in 1970.

  • Victor K. Ross
    1962

    Victor K. Ross

    Syracuse University

    Victor K. Ross

    Syracuse University

    Victor Ross was educated in the Bridgeport, Connecticut school system and graduated from Bridgeport High School in 1918. He went to Syracuse University for engineering, and in 1922, on to the Syracuse Law School receiving his LLB degree in 1924. While at Syracuse, Vic played on both the soccer and lacrosse teams, and was awarded All-America honors for two years (1922 and 1923). Vic continued to play lacrosse after graduation with the New Rochelle Lacrosse Team and the Brooklyn Lacrosse Club, and also did a great deal of officiating over a period of 26 years. He coached for two years at Syracuse and at Brooklyn, and was a great help introducing the game at Union, Williams, and Springfield. Vic also helped to organize the Box Lacrosse League. During his twenty years of competition, Vic was an outstanding attackman and was privileged to go to England with the 1923 Syracuse team, which won the International Lacrosse trophy. After graduating from Syracuse, Vic was very active in private law practice.

  • Frederic A. Fitch
    1961

    Frederic A. Fitch

    Syracuse University

    Frederic A. Fitch

    Syracuse University

    Fitch was educated at the Bulkley School in New London, Connecticut from 1916 to 1920, going from there to the School of Forestry at Syracuse University where he was awarded his Bachelor of Science degree in 1924. At Syracuse, Fred played on the lacrosse team from 1921-24. He had the unique experience of playing on two championship teams - 1922 and 1924. In 1923, he played on a touring Syracuse team that travelled to England where they won 6-3. Fred was awarded first team All-America honors in 1924. After college, Fred played with the Syracuse Crescents, the Brooklyn Cresents, and also for the Montclair Athletic Club. He organized teams to play the Onondaga Indians for several years at Cortland, New York. At one time, Fred played on a team that beat the University of Toronto in Syracuse in the evening, took a train to Montreal and won another game the next morning - thus beating two teams froma foriegn country in less than twenty-four hours. Fred's coaching career dated from 1926 to 1950 where he developed many fine teams at Rutgers University. Not only were these teams known for their hard play but their extreme sportsmanship as well. Fred has coached two North All Star Teams in the annual North-South teams.Fred was extremely active on the All-American committees, being the chairman from 1945 to 1951, and a member from 1960-1962. He was president of the Coaches Committee of the USILA in 1946. He published several reports on All-American selections and other important writings. When Fred left coaching at Rutgers, he was presented with a trophy in memory of his 24 years of service. The engraving on it truly expresses the integrity and lifelong dedication of this man. Fred started out in the business world in 1926 as a sporting goods salesman. After that, he began teaching at the Hun School in Princeton, New Jersey. After six years of government work, he became the assistant superintendent of the New Jersey State Home for Boys at Jamesburg. He then moved to several different schools, but lacrosse was his favorite line of work. Fred Fitch passed away in 1989.

  • William H. Moore
    1961

    William H. Moore

    Johns Hopkins University

    William H. Moore

    Johns Hopkins University

    William "Dinty" Moore was born in Baltimore in 1900 and attended Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, graduating in 1919. He went to Johns Hopkins University, graduating in 1923 with an BA degree. He was later awarded an Honorary D.Sc. Degree from Curry College in Boston in 1940. While in college, Dinty played lacrosse until injured in 1922, but later played for the L'Hirondelle Lacrosse Club from 1924-28 and captained the championship club team in 1928. Also played in the Sunday Lacrosse League in 1929 and 1930. After graduating from Hopkins, Dinty joined the staff of the Baltimore American Newspaper and then became the provost of Johns Hopkins University from 1924-26. He was assistant president of St. John's College from 1926-28; co-headmaster of the Marston's School, 1928-29; president of the Maryland College for Women, 1928-52, and in 1952 became the director of the College Manor Geriatric Institution.

    Dinty's lacrosse coaching experience was quite varied and extremely successful. He coached for 32 years, first at St. John's College from 1927-35, and then at the U.S. Naval Academy from 1936-58. His teams won 232 games and lost only 57. He had 8 undefeated teams - '29-'31-'35-'38-'45-'46-'49-'54, and two additional national championship teams in 1930 and 1943. At the time, this was the greatest number of championships ever won by one single coach. Representing the U.S. in 1931, Dinty coached St. John's College to a series win over Canada. He coached an All-American team in 1936 which toured Western Canada. He coached the South All-Star team to a 14-14 tie in 1946 and a 13-11 win in 1949. Dinty wrote quite a few articles on lacrosse and was the founder of the Lacrosse Newsletter and published it for three years. Some of his other articles were published in Menke's Sport Guide, the Navy Manual, the Christian Science Monitor, and two pamphlets called "Lacrosse Techniques" and "How to Play Lacrosse" and from 1937 through 1946, he had many articles in the Lacrosse Guide.

    His committee record with the USILA and the ISLCA consists of the following: Executive Committee of the USILA in 1940-46, 1959-60; vice-president of the USLCA the first year it was organized; president the second year, and a member of the executive committee every year through 1958; member of the All-American Committee from 1938 to 1949, and again in 1960; chairman of the All-American Committee, 1961-1962; member of the Development Committee for nine years; member of the All-American Reunion Committee in 1958; Promotion Committee Chairman, 1936-38; Guide Committee, 1938-41; Rules Committee - 1940, 1943-46 and 1956-58; chairman of the Archives Committee in 1954; and chairman of the committee which established the Turnbull Trophy. The Moore Trophy was awarded to the winner of one of the divisions of the USILA. In 1961, he had a chair dedicated in the Navy Marine Memorial Stadium and was awarded a plaque from the American Legion (Markland Kelly Post) in 1962. In 1961, Dinty founded the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation, Inc., and was elected its first president. He held this position for ten years. The Lacrosse Foundation was the forerunner of US Lacrosse. Dinty Moore passed away in 1987.

  • Avery Blake Sr
    1961

    Avery F. Blake

    Swarthmore College

    Avery F. Blake

    Swarthmore College

    Avery Blake attended Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, graduating in 1925. He went on to Swarthmore College as a member of the Class of 1928. While at Polytechnic Institute, Blake played four years of lacrosse, three years of basketball, and two years of football. At Swarthmore, Avery played one year of football and one year of lacrosse. After leaving Swarthmore and returning to Baltimore, Avery coached at Baltimore Poly from 1927-30. While coaching at Poly, Avery played for three years with the Mt. Washington lacrosse club and also for the professional box team from 1931-55. He join the physical education department at Swarthmore College in 1931, where he coached lacrosse and assisted in football until he joined the staff at the University of Pennsylvania in 1960. Avery's record at Poly was three championship scholastic teams in his three years of coaching there. At Swarthmore, he won the Penn-Delaware Championship for 13 years, and in 1953, he won the USILA "B" Championship. His coaching also included the All-American Team which went to England in 1937. He coached three North-South squads during his tenure at Swarthmore. Avery's coaching record at Penn since 1960 has found him winning two Penn-Delaware Championships and two championships of the USILA Mid-Atlantic Division. Avery has been extremely active in all phases of lacrosse and has served on the following committees and associations: Publicity Advisor - Rules Committee; Advisory All-American Committees since 1939; Executive Board of the USILA - 1947-1948 and 1957; Executive Board of the USCLA for many years; President and Vice President of the USCLA from 1944 to 1947; also Vice President USILA -1958 until 1961 when he was elected president of the USILA.Avery was the founder and president for several years of the Penn Lacrosse Coaches Association, later changed to the Penn-Del Association. He helped organize, played and reffereed in the old Sunday Lacrosse League in Baltimore. Avery promoted three clinics at Swarthmore College and coached at the Florida Forum for one year.

  • C. G. Mallonee
    1961

    C. G. Mallonee

    Johns Hopkins University

    C. G. Mallonee

    Johns Hopkins University

    Gard Mallonee was born in 1903 in Baltimore and he was educated at the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, graduating in 1922. He continued his education at Johns Hopkins University, gaining a BS in civil engineering in 1928 and a master's degree in education in 1946.While at Poly, Gardner was extremely active in all phases of the athletic program, playing football, lacrosse and basketball. Upon entering Hopkins, he played on the university team in 1926, 1927, 1928, gaining All-American lacrosse honors in 1928. He played on the U.S. Olympic Lacrosse Team in 1928, on the Crescent AC of New York in 1929 and then on to the Johns Hopkins Olympic Club Team from 1930-32. Gard's athletic achievements at Hopkins were as outstanding in football as in lacrosse. He played four years of varsity football, was captain of the 1926-27 team, received All-Maryland honors in 1926 and 1927 and was an All-American honorable mention on the team picked by the New York Sun. After graduating, he played basketball for the Championship Arundel Boat Club Team from 1931 through 1934.

    After graduating from Hopkins, Gard worked for two years as an engineer with the New York Central Railroad before joining the faculty of the Park School in Baltimore where he taught mathematics from 1929 to 1935. While teaching there, he was assistant football and lacrosse coach at Johns Hopkins. In 1935, Gard moved to Hopkins as a teacher of P.E. and also coached, moving up to be the business manager of athletics and on to the directorship of athletics. Gard left Hopkins in 1949 and became a teacher and coach at Forest Park (Md.) High School. During Gard's many years of teaching and athletic work, he was extremely active in the lacrosse associations, being an officer, vice president and president of the USILA. He was group chairman of the North/South game for many years and did much to promote this annual affair during the early years of its inception. Gard wrote several outstanding articles on lacrosse for the Lacrosse Guide, namely, "Lacrosse Defense" "Position of the Goal" and "Zone Defense." Gard is a member of the All-Time Johns Hopkins Team, and in 1994, was inducted into the Johns Hopkins Athletic Hall of Fame. Gardner was married in 1932 to Esther Felter and they had six children - four girls and two boys. His son, Steve "Lucky" Mallonee, was an All-American lacrosse player at Johns Hopkins in the 1960s. Gard Mallonee passed away in 1980.

  • William Maddren
    1961

    William Maddren

    Johns Hopkins University

    William Maddren

    Johns Hopkins University

    The following is an excerpt from The Lacrosse Story by Alexander M. Weyand and Milton R. Roberts concerning Bill Maddren. "Now we come to Johns Hopkins' phenomenal rise to college lacrosse supremacy, which converted sedate Baltimore into a seething hotbed of lacrosse enthusiasm, the like of which had never been seen elsewhere in the United States. That state of affairs was due largely to the efforts of William H. Maddren, who became interested in the sport through peculiar circumstances. His father, who was a doctor in Brooklyn, New York, had as a patient John Flannery. After each game in which he played, Flannery would visit Dr. Maddren to have his wounds dressed. He became a great hero to young Maddren who, upon Flannery's advice, engaged in the sport while attending Brooklyn Polytechnic in 1892. Later Maddren played with the Crescents, and matriculated at Johns Hopkins in order to study medicine. Although only a freshman, he was elected captain and appointed coach in 1897. Dr. Maddren recieved a BS degree from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in 1896 and did graduate work at Johns Hopkins. He received his M.D. degree from Hopkins in 1901. He played lacrosse on the outstanding Hopkins teams of 1897 to 1901 and is a member of the Hopkins All-Time Lacrosse Team.

  • Conrad Sutherland
    1961

    Conrad Sutherland

    Princeton University

    Conrad Sutherland

    Princeton University

    Conrad, or "Suds", did not play lacrosse until his college days at Rutgers, where he played on the 1921 team. Then moving on to Priceton, he played on the varsity squad from 1922-24. The 1924 team was the big three champion. After graduating from Princeton, Suds played on the Cresent Athletic Club team from 1925-32, during which years the Crescent Club won several open championships. Officiating was a large part of Suds life, and he was one of the leading officials from 1932-1954. In 1955, he received a certificate from the USCLA for his able and loyal service to the game of lacrosse. In 1948 he was awarded the USILA award for the person who has done the most for lacrosse.Suds wrote several articles on lacrosse which were published in the lacrosse guides. The many offices that he has held in the Lacrosse Foundation include: secretary-treasurer from 1943-1945; second vice-president and secreatry-treasurer from 1946-1947; first vice president and secretary-treasurer from 1948-1949; and president of the USILA in 1950-1951. Suds was also chairman of the North-South game committee for three or four different occasions. Suds Sutherland passed away in 1961.

  • William J. Harkness
    1961

    William J. Harkness

    Ottawa

    William J. Harkness

    Ottawa

    Bill Harkness was born in 1888, in Belfast, Northern Ireland and came to Canada with his family late in the 19th century. Bill was educated in the public schools of Ottawa and went to the American Correspondence School from 1910-14. While in Canada, Bill's business was with the heating, plumbing and ventilation business, and from 1921-43, he ran the Harkness Brothers business in Glen Falls, New York. From 1945 to 1955, Bill lived in Miami, Florida, and from 1955 to 1961, he was superintendent of the Home Farms in Johnsonville, New York. Bill had quite an athletic career as a player in both lacrosse and hockey. In 1908, he played for the Ottawa Stars Junior Champions; in 1909 to 1910 with the Ottawa Shamrocks City League Champions; in 1913 with the Ottawa Nationals and from 1912 to 1918 with the Ottawa Capitals Professional-National Lacrosse Union. All these were outstanding lacrosse teams. In hockey, his playing career was as follows: 1908-1910 - Ottawa New Edinburgs; 1911-1912 - Ottawa Nationale; 1913-1917 Ottawa Emmetts, and later was manager and player for the Glens Falls New York Club from 1930-1933. Bill's coaching history is as follows: 1929-1940 - lacrosse and hockey coach at Union College; 1945-1948 - coached the RPI lacrosse team which played in London, England in 1948 and was undefeated. In 1951-1962, he coached the RPI freshman hockey team and then moved to Yale in the spring to coach the Yale freshman lacrosse team for the same number of years. He was coaching the Cornell freshman hockey team at the time of his death.

    Bill also did some officiating - both in amateur clubs and college games - from 1932 through 1940. He wrote several short articles on coaching and playing hints. He also did a great deal of missionary work to get lacrosse started in Florida while he was living there in the late 40's and early 50's. In 1936, Bill was an assistant coach with the All-America Team which played a series with Canada and he assisted Joe Lally, the great Canadian, in all of these arrangements. Bill helped run the North-South game in Troy, New York, and also the RPI and Yale tours of England and Scotland. In June 1915, Bill married Anna G. MacDonald. They had two sons who were extremely active in athletics - William A. R. Harkness, born in 1918, who became head coach of lacrosse at Yale University and director of intercollegiate athletics, and Nevin D. (Ned) Harkness, born in 1919, who coached lacrosse as well as hockey for many years at RPI. Ned Harkness was inducted into the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame in 2001, making Bill and Ned one of several father/son inductees. Bill "Pop" Harkness passed away in 1965.

  • Edward M. Stuart
    1961

    Edward M. Stuart

    Johns Hopkins University

    Edward M. Stuart

    Johns Hopkins University

    Stuart was born in 1896 in Baltimore and he was educated at the Baltimore City College from 1909-13. He entered Johns Hopkins University in 1913, graduating with a BS degree in Engineering in 1917. Eddie played lacrosse during his entire time at City College and during his four years at Hopkins. After graduating from Hopkins, he played lacrosse at the Mt. Washington Club from 1919-1925. When he moved to the New York area, he played for the Crescent A.C. in 1926 and 1927. Eddie also played football and was active in track at City College and at Johns Hopkins. Eddie assisted in coaching lacrosse both at Harvard and at M.I.T. while living in the Boston area and also referred for two years. Eddie was active in the Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association and served as vice-president of the USILA and was also on the Rules Committee and the Referees' Committee. He helped to promote lacrosse in the New England area and was deeply interested in this sport from childhood.Professionally, Eddie worked for the Standard Oil Company for two years and then joined the Black and Decker Manufacturing Company of Baltimore and New York, where he became Eastern Division Sales Manager, and then became their Southern Sales Supervisor. He was also Commissioner of Police and President of the Golden Beach, Miami, Florida Town Council.One of the highest honors Eddie received was the Baltimore Evening Sun's annual Athletic Medal for outstanding athletic recognition in 1925. During World War I, Eddie achieved the rank of captain in the Engineers Corp and saw two years of overseas combat duty. Eddie Stuart was one of the finest goalies that ever played, and with his great interest in lacrosse in many of its fields, he is well deserving of this highest honor, election to the Hall of Fame. Eddie Stuart passed away in 1987.

  • Leon A. Miller
    1960

    Leon A. Miller

    Carlisle Indian School

    Leon A. Miller

    Carlisle Indian School

    Leon "Chief" Miller was born in 1895 in Cherokee, North Carolina and attended Cherokee Indian School from 1905-09, progressing to the Carlisle Indian School, which he attended from 1910-16, receiving an M.E. degree in 1916. While at Carlisle, Leon played lacrosse for four years, was also a member of the varsity track squad for four years, and a varsity football player for three years. Leon became head coach of lacrosse at CCNY in 1932 and continued in this capacity until the 1960 season. During his tenure at CCNY, Leon was assistant football coach for three years and became head coach for two years. Leon became an associate professor of health and physical education while at CCNY. Between his graduation from Carlisle and his joining the staff at CCNY, Leon worked as an engineer at the Ford Motor Company in Michigan. Leon did quite a bit of lacrosse officiating from 1919 to 1929. Some of his other lacrosse achievements have been many articles for the New York papers and several syndicated features. For several years, he was the assistant editor of the Intercollegiate Guide. He played lacrosse for the New York Lacrosse Club and had been an outstanding figure in the game for many years. Chief Miller passed away in 1961.

  • Irving B. Lydecker
    1960

    Irving B. Lydecker

    Syracuse University

    Irving B. Lydecker

    Syracuse University

    Lydecker attended Nyack High School, and then went on to Syracuse University, where he graduated with a law degree in 1922. While at Syracuse, Irv played lacrosse in 1920, 1921, and 1922, captaining the 1922 team which won the Intercollegiate Championship and he was named All-American that year. In 1923, Irv went to Europe and played against Oxford and Cambridge and other universities. The team won the International Lacrosse Cup. Irv stayed with the Crescent Club and was an active player through 1934. Besides Irv's lacrosse activities, he was also captain of the basketball, football and baseball teams at the Nyack High School during his senior year. In 1925 and 1926, Irv was the coach of the Harvard University lacrosse team. Irv officiated in many intercollegiate games from 1927 through 1933. He was extremely active in the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association (USILA), serving on many different committees and was president in 1932. From 1935-39, Irv went back to coaching at White Plains (N.Y.) High School. Irv's entire professional life was spent in the legal field. He was a clerk in a law office in New York from 1922-25. In 1925, he opened his own law office in White Plains. During World War I, Irv enlisted in the United States Air Force and was discharged with the rank of sergeant in 1918. Irv Lydecker passed away in 1964.