• Morris F. Touchstone
    1960

    Morris F. Touchstone

    George Williams

    Morris F. Touchstone

    George Williams

    Touchstone played on the Mt. Washington Club team under Coach Bill Schmeisser and conducted the Mt. Washington Summer Camp from 1920-1923. In 1924, Touchstone moved to Yale to coach varsity lacrosse, soccer and freshman gymnastics.In 1928, he became the head varsity lacrosse coach at the United States Military Academy. He coached there until his death in 1957. Compiling a record of 214-73-8 while at West Point, Touchstone's teams won the national championship in 1944 and shared the titles in 1945 with Navy and 1951 with Princeton. Touchstone was the first chairman of the Hall of Fame Committee, 1954-1957; first president of the Lacrosse Coaches Association, 1953-1955; member of the Rules Committee, 1934-1937; member of the All-American Committee, 1939-1950; member of the Executive Board 1939-1940; member of the Publicity Committee, 1943-1944; member of the NCAA Lacrosse Rules Committee, 1946; and advisor to the All-American Committee 1951-1957. The Touchstone Memorial Award, established in 1958 and presented annually to the "Coach of the Year" honors his name. Morris Touchstone passed away in 1957.

  • J. S. Kennedy
    1960

    J. S. Kennedy

    Crescent Athletic Club

    J. S. Kennedy

    Crescent Athletic Club

    The following is an excerpt from a letter from Waldemar H. Fries concerning Sars, whom he knew well. "He [Sars] was one of several Canadian hockey and lacrosse players who came to Brooklyn before the turn of the century from Canada. It is even possible that some encouragement was offered these players by the club. He was both an outstanding hockey and lacrosse player - small, very fast, and agile. On the lacrosse team he played "In Home". When college teams played against the Crescent team in lacrosse, Sars would always coach his opponent, telling him the proper way to cover. He was among the last of the original Canadians to play. He refereed the Cornell-Harvard lacrosse game played at Cambridge in 1910. He was an architect by profession. He used to go to Lake Placid, where I understood that he designed several houses or buildings in that town." Sars was a truly great lacrosse player and not to mention an all around superb athlete. For all that he has done for the game, lacrosse now repays him with its highest honor.

  • Herbert T. Scott
    1960

    Herbert T. Scott

    Crescent Athletic Club

    Herbert T. Scott

    Crescent Athletic Club

    Scott was educated through the school in Toronto and then on to Jarvis Collegiate Institute, Toronto, attending there from 1908 until 1912. Herb played for Riverdale and St. Simon's Lacrosse Club of Toronto. These teams won provincial and Eastern Canada honors in various years from 1912 to 1922. In 1922, Herb joined the Crescent Athletic Club in Brooklyn where he was an outstanding player for ten years. During his youth in Canada, Herb played a great deal of hockey as well as lacrosse. Herb coached the Crescent Athletic Club from 1928 to 1932 when they had some of their most outstanding teams. Herb also played in England with the Canadian Army Team against many English teams during World War I, where he was stationed, serving in the Canadian Field Artillery. Herb spent sixteen years officiating intercollegiate lacrosse in this country, from 1924 to 1940, and was active in all phases of intercollegiate programs. Herb Scott passed away in 1981.

  • John H. Paige
    1960

    John H. Paige

    Colgate University

    John H. Paige

    Colgate University

    Paige was born in 1908 in Ogdensburg, New York and attended Ogdensburg Free Academy, graduating in 1926. Moving on to Colgate University, John received his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1930. While at Colgate, he played basketball and football as well as lacrosse, but lacrosse was his main love and he played on the team from 1927-1930, making the All-American team in 1930. John was field captain of the All-American team, which played a series of games that year with the Canadian champions in Toronto. After leaving Colgate, he continued playing at the Crescent Athletic Club and was captain of the 1938 team. He also played in the Olympic Trial games in the 1932 and 1936 seasons. John spent his entire career in the telephone business. He held various positions with the New York Telephone Company, the American Telephone and Telegraph Company and the Wisconsin Telephone Company, of which he became vice-president of public relations and merchandising. During the many years that John spent with the New York Telephone Company and lived in the East, he was extremely active in all phases of lacrosse. He held all of the offices of the USILA, starting with secretary and ending with president, and was a member of the Executive Committee for many years until he moved West in 1948. Perhaps, what everyone will remember most in John's career in lacrosse administration was his significant role in starting the North/South All-Star Game just before World War II. John, along with several lacrosse figures, created and developed this game into what it became today. John was married in 1935 to Lois Ferguson and they had five children - Joan, Margaret, William F., Elisabeth, and John H. Jr.

  • John C. Knipp
    1959

    John C. Knipp

    Johns Hopkins University

    John C. Knipp

    Johns Hopkins University

    Knipp was born in 1895 in Baltimore and attended Baltimore City College, graduating in 1912. He continued his education at Johns Hopkins University and graduated with a BA degree in 1917. John played lacrosse on championship teams at Baltimore City College in 1911 and 1912, and played lacrosse at Johns Hopkins from 1913-17. He was captain of the 1917 team. Moving to the Mt. Washington Club, John played for three years, 1920, 1925 and 1926, and captained the 1920 team. While at Johns Hopkins, John also played football. In 1915, John played with the University of Toronto's championship team. After his playing days, John coached lacrosse at Mt. Washington and also at Johns Hopkins. Knipp did some officiating during the early 1920s, but most of his lacrosse work was either as a player or a coach. Other honors that he received in lacrosse are as follows: member of the Bill Schnmeisser's All-Time Hopkins Lacrosse Team, honorary member of the U.S. Lacrosse Coaches' Association, and a member of the Board of Directors of the Lacrosse Hall of Fame Foundation. In business, John was a member of the firm of John C. Knipp & Sons of Baltimore, an interior decorating and furnishing company. During World War I, he enlisted as a cadet in the Army Air Service for pilot training, transferred to the Artillery Observation Group, but saw no service because of the Armistice. John Knipp passed away in 1962.

  • Cyril D. Brower
    1959

    Cyril D. Brower

    Hobart College

    Cyril D. Brower

    Hobart College

    Cyril D. "Darb" Brower was born in 1898, in Woodmere, N.Y. After being educated at Woodmere High School from 1912 to 1916, Darb matriculated to New York University. In 1919, he transferred to Hobart College and was president of his senior class at Hobart, graduating in 1921 with a BS degree. Darb began playing lacrosse at Hobart in 1920, earning varsity letters in 1920 and 1921. He also received varsity letters at Hobart as a member of the football team of 1920, the basketball teams of 1919 and 1920, and the indoor track teams of 1919 and 1920. Darb was also honored as the captain of the 1920 and 1921 track teams. In two years at Hobart, Darb earned seven varsity letters. Throughout college, he earned a total of 14 varsity letters in five sports.After graduating from Hobart, Darb played lacrosse for the Crescent Athletic Club. Known as "Cy" by his teammates, he played for the Crescents from 1922-29 and is considered one of their greatest players. At the same time, he officiated lacrosse and football in the New York metropolitan area. Darb also served on the Advisors Rules Committee of the USILA for many years. He eventually became president of the USILA (1942-1943) and served on its executive board. In 1922, Darb began a career in banking that would extend for 32 years. Most of those years were spent with The Commercial National Bank and Trust Company of New York, where he served as head of the Real Estate Division of the Trust Department and as Head of Purchasing and Real Estate. Darb passed away in 1954, at the age of 55.

  • 1959

    Norris C. Barnard

    Swarthmore College

    Norris C. Barnard

    Swarthmore College

    Barnard was born in 1897 in Westfield, N.J. and attended Manual Training High School in Brooklyn, N.Y., graduating in 1915. He went on to Swarthmore College where he graduated with an AB degree in 1919 and a mechanical engineering degree in 1923. In high school, Barnard played football as well as lacrosse, and while at Swarthmore he lettered in lacrosse from 1916-19. After college, Barnard moved on to the Crescent Athletic Club where he played for seven years, from 1920-26, and captained the team for its last three years in 1923, 1925, and 1926. During Barnard's career at the Crescent Athletic Club, the team was always one of the best in the country and much of the credit should be given to Barnard's excellent goal keeping. After moving to Philadelphia, he joined the Philadelphia Lacrosse Club and played with them in 1927 and 1928. He then went on to the Penn Athletic Club of Philadelphia, where he played for six years from 1929-34, and was captain of the 1930 and ‘31 teams. After that, Barnard joined the Montclair (N.J.) Athletic Club and played for this club from 1935-37, and he captained the 1937 team. For eight years, from 1921-28, Barnard was one of the leading lacrosse officials and refereed many games at Cornell, Hobart, Lehigh, New York University, Princeton, Rutgers, Syracuse and Yale. Barnard organized two different teams to play against the Crescent Athletic Club in a three-game series in July in both 1934 and 1935 at the Balsamas Hotel in Dixville Notch, N.H. In 1934, the Trent Athletic Club beat the Crescent Athletic Club two out of three games, and in 1935, the Montclair Athletic Club beat the Crescent Athletic Club two out of three games, and these games will long be remembered by the players and the guests of this famous hostelry. Barnard was a member of the USILA Executive Committee in 1937 and is an honorary life member of the U.S. Lacrosse Coaches' Association.

  • William H. Hudgins
    1959

    William H. Hudgins

    Johns Hopkins University

    William H. Hudgins

    Johns Hopkins University

    Born in 1886 in Baltimore, Hudgins graduated from Boys' Latin School in 1903 after which he continued his education at Johns Hopkins University, receiving an BA degree in 1905. He took some graduate work at Hopkins in 1906 and then received his LLD degree at the University of Maryland Law School in 1908. He was admitted to practice before the United State Supreme Court in 1927. He continued to practice law as an associate with the firm of Willis and Hudgins, and at the death of Mr. Willis, became associated with the firm of Wyatt and Jones and was with them until his death in 1956.Bill played lacrosse at Johns Hopkins in 1904, 1905 and 1906, and was a member of the championship team of 1906. He was a very outstanding attack man during these years. After graduation, he played lacrosse with the Mt. Washington Club in 1907, 1908 and 1909 and was captain of the 1908 and 1909 teams. Along with other Hopkins men, Bill helped to start lacrosse at the Naval Academy and helped coach the team in its earlier days. His major sport interest was lacrosse and he devoted much time and energy in helping to develop and coach the game. For many years, Bill was active in officiating at many lacrosse games throughout the Maryland area. Besides lacrosse, Bill was a very fine tennis player and did most of his playing at the Baltimore Country Club. Bill served as a first lieutenant in World War I in the Army Air Service. William Hudgins died in 1956, and was inducted posthumously to the National Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

  • William C. Wylie
    1959

    William C. Wylie

    University of Maryland

    William C. Wylie

    University of Maryland

    Wylie, known as "Cas", was educated at Baltimore City College form 1909 to 1911. He continued his education at the University of Maryland, receiving an LLD. degree in 1914 from the University of Maryland Law School.Cas played lacrosse while at City College for three years, captaining the championship team in his senior year, 1911. Cas organized, played for and captained the Walbrook Athletic Club team in 1912, 1913, and 1914. Transferring to the Mt. Washington Club team, he played in 1915 and 1916 and again from 1920-1927, and captained the Mt. Washington Team in 1922. During his playing days, Cas was known as one of the finest lacrosse players in the country. In 1926, he was the first lacrosse player ever to be awarded the Evening Sun Medal for his outstanding record as a player and his brilliant work throughout the country in serving lacrosse as president of the USILA. Cas was one of the original men to help organize and start lacrosse at the University of Maryland. He officiated from 1922-1936 and was considered one of the best officials in the game. In 1927, Cas made a trip to Europe to arrange for a lacrosse team to participate in the 1928 Olympics at Amsterdam. He was elected vice president of the International Federation of Amateur Lacrosse the same year. His administative duties in lacrosse included being vice president of the USILA in 1925, president in 1926 and 1927, executive board in 1926-1929, and served on the ranking committee from 1928-1930. He served on the Olympic Committee in 1930 and on the play off committee for the Olympics in 1932. Cas Wylie passed away in 1949.

  • Russell S. Hawkins
    1959

    Russell S. Hawkins

    New York University

    Russell S. Hawkins

    New York University

    Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1904, Hawkins attended Boys High School in Brooklyn where he was captain of the lacrosse team and was selected as center on the New York All-Scholastic Team in 1922. He attended Brown University from 1922-24 and New York University from 1924-1927. At NYU, he played varsity basketball for three years and varsity lacrosse for two years. In 1925, he was interim lacrosse coach at NYU and in 1927 he was captain of the lacrosse team. From 1927-1936 he played for the Crescent Athletic Club, was captain of the team of 1932 and was coach of the 1935 team. He served on a New York Metropolitan Committee to develop lacrosse teams in New York Colleges. A bond specialist, Hawkins was a securities bond salesman and was past vice-president of Wm. E. Pollock & Co., Inc. of New York. He was on the board of directors of the Dr. Marcus Nadler Scholarship fund and a member of the Bankers Club of America, the Society of Colonial Wars, the U.S. Navy League, the American Finance Association, the N.Y.U. Men's Finance Club (President), and of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. He was one of the best midfielders of his day, in college or club. He possessed blazing speed, great endurance and an accurate shot, as well as being an inspirational leader.

  • Reginald V. Truitt
    1959

    Reginald V. Truitt

    University of Maryland

    Reginald V. Truitt

    University of Maryland

    Truitt was born in 1891 in Snow Hill, Maryland and graduated from Snow Hill High School in 1910. He attended the University of Maryland, 1910-14, receiving a BS degree. He later received a Master of Science degree in 1921 and a Ph.D. degree at the American University in Washington, D.C. in 1929. While at the University of Maryland, he won his varsity award in both lacrosse and track in 1911, 1912, 1913 and 1914. He was captain as well as student coach of the 1914 team. Reggie served as the first official coach at the University of Maryland from 1919 to 1927. Truitt was awarded a special "M" Club Award and citation in 1950 for his coaching career at the University and a special gold lacrosse pendant for coaching the national champion team in the 1920's. Truitt also was very active in the officiating of lacrosse during the 1920's and 30's; some of the most thrilling contests being those between the Mount Washington Club and the Crescent Club, and in the International Series between St. John's College and the Canadians. Dr. Truitt wrote many articles for the press and Sunday features on lacrosse, which were published in the Baltimore papers. Dr. Truitt was very active in bringing two teams from Oxford-Cambridge to play a series of American colleges and had full charge of their schedule and traveling arrangements, including receptions at the White House and the British Embassy. He was very active in the USILA from 1919 into the 1930's and held many prominent offices during this time. During World War I, Dr. Truitt was a pursuit pilot with a commission as 2nd Lieutenant, and was again called on by his country in the World War II where as a dollar-a-year man he received a Navy Commendation for his research on underwater sound. After leaving the coaching field, he was a partner in the George W. Truitt & Company, oyster growers and dealers at Snow Hill, Maryland until 1943. Reggie Truitt passed away in 1990.

  • Waldemar H. Fries
    1959

    Waldemar H. Fries

    Cornell University

    Waldemar H. Fries

    Cornell University

    Fries was born in 1889 in Brooklyn, New York and was educated at the Adelphi Academy, graduating in 1906. He went to Cornell University where he graduated with a BS degree in agriculture in 1911. He continued his education by attending the Graduate School of Banking at Rutgers University. While at Cornell, Pat played lacrosse for four years and captained the 1911 team. He continued his lacrosse playing at the Crescent Athletic Club and ended up being captain of their team in 1919. Pat started refereeing in the early 1920's, refereed for many years and held the job of chief referee. Pat was one of the officials in the first Army-Navy lacrosse game. Pat coached lacrosse at the University of Pennsylvania from 1924 through 1927, and at his ripe old age of 71, was active on the field again helping coach at Brown University. Fries' business life has all been in the banking world, where he was connected with the Commercial Banking and Mortgage, Vice President of Tradesman's National Bank in Philadelphia and later Vice-President and Treasurer of Bankers Bond and Mortgage Corporation of Philadelphia until his retirement in 1955. During World War I, Pat was an aviator and had a fine record. Pat Fries passed away in 1985.