• Lynn Craun
    2008

    Lynn Craun

    James Madison University

    Lynn Craun

    James Madison University

    Inducted as a truly great umpire, Craun has been one of the top umpires in the country over the last 30 years. A former team captain at James Madison University and member of the U.S. team in 1980 and 1982, Craun has officiated at the highest levels of the game nationally and internationally.She worked her first NCAA Division I championship game in 1998 and she has officiated at the last two IFWLA World Cups in addition to the 1999 IFWLA U-19 World Championship. A 1999 inductee into the US Lacrosse Charlottesville Chapter Hall of Fame, Craun has been a frequent instructor to help train new umpires.

  • Dom Starsia
    2008

    Dom Starsia

    Brown University

    Dom Starsia

    Brown University

    Inducted as a truly great coach, Starsia is one of the most successful coaches in the sport’s history and one of just three men’s coaches to have won at least 100 games at two schools. He coached at Brown from 1982 to 1992, compiling a record of 101-46, leading his alma mater to two Ivy League titles and five NCAA tournament berths while being named the USILA Morris Touchstone Coach of the Year in 1985 and 1991. He received the Touchstone Award for a third time in 2011. In 1993, he took over at Virginia and at the time of his induction in 2008, he had led the Cavaliers to three national championships (1999, 2003 and 2006). Starsia stepped down at Virginia following the 2016 season, his 24th with the Cavaliers, with a record of 274-103. His teams won ACC championships in 1997, 1999, 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2010 and NCAA championships in 1999, 2003, 2006, and 2011. In total, he led UVA to 13 NCAA semifinal appearances. Starsia’s 375 total career wins as the head coach at Brown and Virginia are the most in Division I history. An outstanding defenseman, Starsia earned All-America honors twice at Brown, was a four-time All-Club player and a member of the 1978 U.S. national team. He has been inducted into the Brown University Athletic, US Lacrosse New England and Charlottesville Chapter halls of fame.

  • Roberta Brennan
    2008

    Roberta Brennan

    Boston Women's Lacrosse

    Roberta Brennan

    Boston Women's Lacrosse

    Inducted as a truly great player, Brennan was a member of the U.S. National Team from 1953 to 1968, including a spot on the undefeated 1957 touring team to Great Britain and Ireland. She was also selected for the 1969 tour to Australia, but was unable to attend due to occupational obligations. Her club career stretched over two decades (1947 to 1969) with the Boston Women’s Lacrosse Association and she also had a distinguished career as a coach and official. She served as a head coach at Lesley College, Cambridge School of Weston, Brandeis University and Cambridge High & Latin. She was a nationally-rated umpire and served in that capacity for 20 years. She was inducted into the Boston University Athletics Hall of Fame in 2001.

  • Chris Sailer
    2008

    Chris Sailer

    Princeton University

    Chris Sailer

    Princeton University

    Inducted as a truly great coach, Sailer has been one of the nation’s top coaches since taking over the Princeton University program in 1986. At the time of her induction, Sailer had led Princeton to 18 NCAA tournament appearances, nine Ivy League titles, 11 NCAA Final Fours and national championships in 1994, 2002 and 2003. Her 296 career victories through the end of the 2010 season ranked second among active coaches. She is also a three-time winner of the IWLCA Division I Coach of the Year award.Prior to beginning her coaching career, she was a two-time All-Ivy League selection at Harvard and a member of the 1983 U.S. national team. She has been inducted into the Haverford High School, Harvard Varsity Club, and the US Lacrosse New England and Philadelphia/Eastern Pennsylvania halls of fame.

  • Gail Cummings-Danson
    2007

    Gail Cummings-Danson

    Temple University

    Gail Cummings-Danson

    Temple University

    Cummings-Danson, the top goal scorer in women’s lacrosse history, was inducted as a truly great player. Cummings-Danson scored an NCAA record 289 goals during her career at Temple University, including 88 in 1988 when she led Temple to a perfect 19-0 record and the NCAA championship.She was a three-time All-American, earning first team honors in 1987 and 1988, and was the MVP of the North-South All-Star Game following her senior season. Cummings-Danson played for the Canadian national team from 1982 to 1989 and then helped the U.S. win the World Cup in 1993. Currently the director of athletics at Skidmore College, she previously coached lacrosse at Temple, Connecticut College, and the University at Albany. She has been inducted into the Temple University Hall of Fame and was the first female inductee to the Ontario Lacrosse Hall of Fame.

  • Brian Wood
    2007

    Brian Wood

    Johns Hopkins University

    Brian Wood

    Johns Hopkins University

    Wood, one of the most prolific attackman of his era, was inducted as a truly great player. A product of St. Mary's High School in Annapolis, Wood became a four-time All-American at Johns Hopkins University, earning first team honors his final three seasons after taking second team honors as a freshman. He helped lead Hopkins to three national championships, winning the title in 1984, 1985 and 1987, and the Blue Jays compiled a 47-6 record during his four seasons. Wood finished his career with 100 goals and 78 assists and was named to the Johns Hopkins All-Time Team at the end of his career. Wood was a member of the 1986 U.S. team that captured the world championship and he has also coached the sport at several levels.
     

  • Susan K. Kidder
    2007

    Susan K. Kidder

    East Stroudsburg University

    Susan K. Kidder

    East Stroudsburg University

    Kidder, a member of the first U.S. World Cup team, is being inducted as a truly great player. Kidder played four years at East Stroudsburg University and was named the school’s outstanding senior female athlete in 1969. She made the U.S. team for the first time in 1970 and her decade plus involvement with the program culminated in 1982 with the U.S. winning the first World Cup. Kidder was the head coach at Norristown (Pa.) High School from 1972 to 1981 and also served as an assistant coach for Ursinus College’s 1983 NCAA Division III national championship team. Kidder has been inducted into the East Stroudsburg University Athletic Hall of Fame and the US Lacrosse Philadelphia Chapter Hall of Fame.

  • Karl "Rip" Rippelmeyer
    2007

    Karl "Rip" Rippelmeyer

    United States Naval Academy

    Karl "Rip" Rippelmeyer

    United States Naval Academy

    Rippelmeyer, a star offensive player that helped usher in Navy’s dominance in the 1960s, was inducted as a truly great player. Rippelmeyer earned All-American honors three times, including first team recognition in 1960 when he led the Midshipmen to the USILA national championship. He was the South team captain in that year’s North-South game. While serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, Rippelmeyer played for the Baltimore Lacrosse Club (Open Champs) in 1961 and for the Mt. Washington Lacrosse Club (Open Champs) in 1964. He also helped to organize and coach a team of Camp Pendleton (Ca.) marines to an undefeated season on the West Coast. Rippelmeyer received several citations for his service in the U.S. Marine Corps, including a Bronze Star with "V" and the Navy Meritorious Service Medal. He has been inducted into the US Lacrosse Greater Baltimore Chapter Hall of Fame.

  • Tim Goldstein
    2007

    Tim Goldstein

    Cornell University

    Tim Goldstein

    Cornell University

    Goldstein, a star attackman at Cornell, was inducted as a truly great player. Originally from Stony Brook, New York, Goldstein led the Big Red to the NCAA championship game in 1987, when he was named the Most Outstanding Player of the NCAA Tournament after scoring 25 points in three games, tying the NCAA tournament record. Cornell finished as the national runner-up with a final 13-1 record that season. Goldstein led the nation in scoring in 1987 with 100 points, becoming just the second collegiate player to top 100 points in a season. He set the collegiate single-season record with 73 assists in 1987. In addition to being selected as the Ivy League's Player of the Year in 1987, Goldstein was named a first-team All-American in both 1987 and 1988 and received the Enners Award in 1987 as the USILA’s Player of the Year. He concluded his career ranking fourth on Cornell's all-time scoring list with 168 points, and second in career assists with 122. Following college, Goldstein played on the 1990 U.S. Men’s National Team that won a world championship. He has been previously inducted into the US Lacrosse Long Island Metro Chapter Hall of Fame.

  • Thomas Sears
    2007

    Thomas Sears

    University of North Carolina

    Thomas Sears

    University of North Carolina

    Sears, a dominant goalie for two national championship teams, is being inducted as a truly great player. Sears was a three-time All-American at North Carolina, earning the C. Markland Kelly Award in 1981 and 1982 as the nation’s outstanding goalie. He led Carolina to national championships both of those years. Sears was named the ACC's Player of the Year in 1982 and also earned the Enners Award as the USILA's Player of the Year that season. He was recognized by the NCAA on its 25th Anniversary team and by the ACC on its 50th Anniversary team. North Carolina retired his number "27" jersey in 2003. Sears helped the U.S. to the International Lacrosse Federation World Championship in 1982 when he earned All-World honors. He has been inducted into the US Lacrosse Greater Baltimore Chapter Hall of Fame.

  • Susan Ford
    2007

    Susan Ford

    Connecticut College

    Susan Ford

    Connecticut College

    Ford, a longtime fixture in the sport, was inducted as a truly great contributor, for contributions in the fields of coaching, umpiring, development and service. A four-year player at Connecticut College, she later coached at Concord Academy and Wellesley College, where she led her 1988 team to an undefeated regular season and her 1990 squad to the national quarterfinals of the NCAA Tournament while setting a school-record for victories. The New England Women's Eight Conference named her as Coach of the Year in 1990. At the post-collegiate level, Ford coached Boston and New England club teams. An umpire for 35 years, Ford served on the United States Women’s Lacrosse Association Board of Directors for many years and helped transition the USWLA, as its president, into US Lacrosse in 1998. She also received the National Emeritus ranking in 2001 by the National Umpiring Committee. Ford served on the Board of Directors for the US Lacrosse Foundation from 1998 to 2003. She has been inducted previously into the Connecticut College Athletic Hall of Fame (1991) and the US Lacrosse New England Chapter Hall of Fame (1997). She received the Nancy Chance Service Award in 2002.

  • Sharon G. Pfluger
    2007

    Sharon G. Pfluger

    College of New Jersey

    Sharon G. Pfluger

    College of New Jersey

    Pfluger, who has won over 92 percent of her games at The College of New Jersey, was inducted as a truly great coach. Still active at the time of her induction, Pfluger had amassed a 318-26 record in 21 seasons at TCNJ, setting an NCAA record with a career winning percentage of 92.4. Her teams have won 11 NCAA Division III championships and won an NCAA-record 102 consecutive games from 1991 to 1997. She has twice been selected the IWLCA Division III National Coach of the Year and she has also led the TCNJ field hockey team to seven NCAA championships and nearly 400 victories since 1985. As a player, she was a two-time All-American at the school. Pfluger has been inducted into the US Lacrosse New Jersey Chapter Hall of Fame.